Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 230
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 230. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/287.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 230. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/287

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 230, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/287.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 230
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_253.jpg
Transcript 2jo PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. (laptain R. F. Burton, who has recently visited it, says that the people of'Akabah call it simol Jebel el Kulat (Mount of the Fort). It has had a puzzling variety of names attrii it variations of the words El Kurey and El Kureiyeh, meaning "the village," or "the ruin" Laborde calls it El Graie. It is a grey granite rock, dyked with decaying porphyritic trap, and everywhere veined with white and various coloured quartzes. The shape is a long ova! about three hundred and forty by one hundred and fifty yards, and it consists of two stony mounds united by an isthmus. The northern peak is the higher, and rises about a hundred yards above the sea-level. It is encircled with barrier reefs of coraline. At the extreme north there is a tower, and on the northern mound, which is scarped here and there, stands the castle keep, defended by an enceinte. In the highest part there is a carefully cemented underground i ii. in which there are two pointed arches divided by a tall column. Below there is a small harbour, and the pier leads to a covered way enabling the garrison safely to circulate round the base of the island. The southern knob supports similar but inferior constructions. I aptain Burton, from whose account the above description is gleaned says : u Th< vidently European, built in the days when the Crusaders held El 'Akabah ; but it probabh ts upon Roman ruins, and the latter, perhaps, upon Egyptian remains of far older dat Saracenic buildings may date from the reign of Salah-ed-Din (Saladin), who drove out the Crusaders in 1107 a.d." In the year a.d. 1182 the island was unsuccessfully besieged by Raynald of Chatillon, and in the time of Abulfeda (about 1300) the island was ahead] abandoned and the governor transferred to the castle on the mainland Kul'at el 'Akabah; thus all the important structures must have' been erected prior to that date. For cent it has been either utterly deserted or used as a place of refuge or abode by pirates and fishermen. THE CONVENT OF ST. CATHERINE. The Caravan or Hajj route of Christian pilgrims from Syria and Palestine to the Convent of St. Catherine and the " holy places " in its neighbourhood, runs from the \ aft the 'Arabah round the head of the Gulf of 'Akabah, and winds along its western si Travellers who approach the Sinaitic peninsula from the north-east, instead of from usually follow the same route, traversing the shell-strewn sands at the foot of a mountain of grey granite intersected at intervals by stony wadys strewn with gravel. At the mouth ni the broad and barren Wady Merakh, within sight of Jezirat page 224), the traveller is compelled to change his escort, (or here the territorj ol 1 Haiwat tribe of Arabs terminates, and that of the great Tawarah tribe comm< some distance south of this point the road passes over high promontories stretching the The Land of Midian, on the opposite or eastern side of the gulf can be plainly Far inland, and tinged light blue by the distance, rise the sharp and saw-like ere: