Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 227
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 227. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/284.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 227. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/284

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 227, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/284.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 227
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_250.jpg
Transcript MOUNT HOR AND THE CLLFFS OF EDOM. 22; winter torrents rush down from the chasms and wadys of Edom and from channels in the western hills, they form a little watercourse along the western side of the valley and enter the Gulf of 'Akabah at its north-west corner. The mountains on the east are two thousand to two thousand five hundred feet, and those on the west fifteen to eighteen hundred feet in height It is recorded that " King Solomon made a navy of ships in Ezion Geber, on the shore of the Red Sea, in the land of Edom " (1 Kings ix. 26). Of this ancient seaport there is now no vestige left; but its site has been identified with the position of a spring of brackish water called 'Ain el Ghudian, and opposite to a wady of the same name which runs from the western hills into the great valley of the 'Arabah, at a point which is now nearly ten miles from the seashore, but which must have been the northern point of the Red Sea, " in the land of Edom," in the time of King Solomon. (A somewhat similar change in the position of the sea margin is said to have been observed at the head of the Gulf of Suez.) The identification of the site of Ezion Geber does not, however, rely on the configuration of the valley or on the existence of the springs of brackish water at this point. The nomenclature is regarded as the proof, for, though in appearance so different, the word Ezion, in its original Hebrew form, and the Arabic word El Ghudian, are actually identical, letter for letter ; and they correspond phonetically, as Professor Palmer observes, with " Diana," the Latin form of the name as it appears on the Peutinger Tables.* It is there shown that " Diana" (Ezion) was sixteen Roman, that is fourteen and a half English miles from " Haila " (Elath), which agrees with the position assigned to the former at El Ghudian. There has never been any doubt respecting the position of Elath; its site is still marked by extensive mounds of rubbish at the head of the Gulf of 'Akabah, on the eastern curve of the bay. In the history of this place there is scarcely a missing link since Solomon used it as his seaport. In the reign of Ahaz it was conquered by the Syrians and the Jews were driven from it (2 Kings xvi. 6). It is mentioned frequently by Greek and Roman writers under the name of Ailah and yElena, and was the station of a Roman legion. In the days of Jerome it still traded with India. On the approach of the victorious army of the followers of Mohammed in a.d. 630, John, the Christian King of Ailah, submitted voluntarily to the conquerors, and secured peace by payment of tribute. From this time the place declined, and Baldwin I., in the year a.d. 1116, with two hundred followers, took possession of it, having found it deserted. Saladin (Salah-ed-Din) regained it in 1167, and it was never fully recovered by the Crusaders, though the reckless Raynald of Chatillon seized upon the town and held it for a few days. Aileh, or 'Akabah Aileh, as the modern representative of the ancient city of Elath is called, is one of the chief stations on the route of the Egyptian Hajj the yearly caravan of * This remarkable work owes its name Tabula Peutingeriana to Peutinger, a scholar and statesman of Augsburg, who was long its possessor. It is a rude chart or delineation of the military roads of the Roman empire, with the distances between the towns, constructed not later than the fourth century. By some authorities it is believed to date from the reign of Alexander Severus, a.d. 222-235. The present copy, the only one known to exist, appears to have been made in the twelfth or thirteenth century. It is a long narrow chart wound on rollers, and is preserved m the Imperial Library at Vienna. It has been of great value to students of biblical topography, and a facsimile of it has been published.