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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 223
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 223. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/280.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 223. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/280

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 223, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/280.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 223
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_246.jpg
Transcript MOUNT HOR AND THE CLIFFS OF EDOM. 223 The highest point of the mountain is said to be four thousand feet above the level of the sea. Owing to the frequent contentions which take place among the local tribes of Arabs, and their somewhat capricious dealings with strangers, travelling in the land of Edom is rather difficult, and the ascent of Mount Hor is occasionally rendered impossible. The late Mr. James Finn, during his residence in Palestine as H.B.M. Consul, did much to facilitate expeditions to Petra and Mount Hor, by personally visiting these places and making arrangements with the sheikhs of local tribes for the safe conduct and escort of English travellers for a fixed sum per head. He thus describes his approach to and ascent of Mount Hor:— " April 4th. At length we were upon the great plain of the Wady 'Arabah, or ' Wilderness of Zin;' and our path was to be diagonally across this, pointed direct to Mount Hor. " April 5th Distances are hard to judge of in such extensive plains and in so clear an atmosphere. We had been travelling nearly two days with Mount Hor in sight, straight before us ; yet the mountain only grew in size as we approached it, not in distinctne As we came near to the eastern mountains, we found innumerable and huge blocks of porphyry rock scattered over the ground We turned off from the Wady 'Arabah by the Wady Tayibeh, which runs south-east into the heart of the mountain. We ascended a series of precipices, and at a quarter before four caught the first glimpse of Aaron's tomb, and at five pitched our tents on the rugged side of Hor, among crags and scented plants, enlivened by numerous cuckoos and the sweet warbling of one little bird. During the last hour we had seen some blue pigeons, one partridge, and, separately, two large eagles, to which our attention had been drawn by their shadows moving on the ground before us; then on looking upwards, the royal birds were seen sailing along, silently and slowly, against the blue vault of ether. "April 6th. In the morning we advanced upwards towards Aaron's tomb, sometimes clambering on our hands and knees. We had to rest occasionally in the shade of large trees of 'Arar (juniper). The refm (a large kind of broom) was very abundant and covered with white blossom, shedding the richest perfume." [This is the rothem, nrn of i Kings xix. 4, 5, mentioned as having sheltered Elijah. It is the largest shrub of Sinai, Genista monosperma.\ 11 The mountain is all of dark red colour; and the higher we ascended, the more difficult we found the progress to be. At length all further advance seemed impossible, till, on looking round, we observed an excavation for a well, with masonry around it; and beyond this were steps cut into the rock, which rock was sloped at an angle of between fifty and sixty degrees. This encouraged us to persevere. Still higher I picked up some tesserae of mosaic and morsels of marble and alabaster. At length we attained the highest peak, where there was scarcely more space than sufficient to contain the small wely." [An oblong stone structure surmounted by a dome plastered and whitewashed.] M On entering we found near the door a common-looking tomb, over which was spread a pall of silk, striped in red, green, and white, but much faded. Against a pillar which supports the roof were hung rows of coloured rags