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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 211
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 211. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 211. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/267

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 211, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/267.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 211
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_233.jpg
Transcript THE SOUTHERN BORDERLAND. 21 I die country, though now little more than a barren waste, shows signs of extensive former cultivation, reaching down even to a comparatively recent period. This tract of land is the Negeb, or south country of Scripture ; and 'Ain Kadis is situated on the frontier of the district. Between this and the edge of the plateau of the Tih the country is even more barren, but there are still traces of a primaeval race of inhabitants who found a living on its soil. At the time of the Exodus it must have borne the same relation to the then fertile district of the Negeb which that now barren land bears to Palestine at the present day. Now the spies went up from Kadesh, and returned bringing with them grapes from Eshcol, which, as has been stated above, many geographers identify with Wady el Khulil, or the Wady of Hebron. But the city of Hebron is at least four days' journey from 'Ain Gadis, and grapes and figs could not have been brought so far without spoiling—to say nothing of the cautious manner in which Caleb and his companions must have passed through the country. If, then, Kadesh Barnea is at 'Ain Kadis, the grape-bearing Eshcol must be near the same place ; and it is a curious fact that among the most striking characteristics of the Negeb are miles of country—hillsides and valleys covered with small stone heaps, swept in regular swathes, and called by the Arabs to this day teleilat el 'anab, or "grape mounds." From a strategical point of view also, 'Ain el Weibeh is ill adapted for the site of Kadesh Barnea, as the Israelites would there have been confined in a cul de sac, with the Canaanites, Amorites, Edomites, and Moabites completely hemming them in ; whereas in the neighbourhood of 'Ain Kadis they would have nothing but the wilderness around them, and certainly no very hostile peoples in their rear. A good general like Moses would scarcely have chosen a bad position for his camp, and the probabilities therefore are that the more western 'Ain Kadis is really the Kadesh Barnea of the Bible. From 'Ain el Weibeh we descend into the broad valley of the Arabah, and, mounting the opposite banks, enter Edom by the Nemelah Pass, and reach Petra by way of the magnificent ravine called the Sik (see page 219). Edom is that narrow strip of country between the Arabah and the Derb el Hajj, or Pilgrim Road to Mecca; it extends northwards from Akabah, the ancient Elath, on the Red Sea to Wady Kerek, which formed the ancient boundary between it and Moab. The district is divided into two parts, the northern portion of which is now called J ebal, the Gebal of the Hebrew, known to the ancient Romans as Gebalene. The southern portion is called Esh Sherah, and corresponds to the Mount Seir of the Bible. The capital city was called in Hebrew, Sela, "the rock" (2 Kings xiv. 7), and still bears the equivalent Latin appellation of Petra, although the natives speak of it as Wady Musa, or " the Valley of Moses." Edom consists of a range of porphyritic rock covered by a mass of sandstone coloured with the most warm and vivid tints. On either side rise limestone hills, those on the east forming the outpost of the great plateau of the Arabian Desert, while the lower range on the west forms the eastern bank of the Arabah, which valley skirts the south country and the Badiet et Tih, or " Desert of the Wanderings." The district is very fertile, the valleys being