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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 195
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 195. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 195. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/251

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 195, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/251.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 195
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_217.jpg
Transcript THE SOUTHERN BORDERLAND. Tas himself to Hebron, " to fulfil a vow" and offer up sacrifices at the altar of Jehovah for the success of his revolt against his father, for then as now Hebron was next in sanctity only to Jerusalem itself. The ancient name of Hebron was Kirjath-Arba, literally "the city of four," which the rabbinical commentators explain to mean the four patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam. The Bible, however, says, " And the name of Hebron before was Kirjath- Arba; which Arba was a great man among the Anakims." (Josh. xiv. 15.) Unlike most towns in Palestine, Hebron does not stand upon a hill, but lies in the narrow part of a valley, called Wady Khulil, the continuation of Wady et Tuffah. Some have conjectured that the ancient city was situated on the hill north-west of the modern town : this would agree with the Bible narrative, which makes Machpelah to have been " in a field before Mamre—the same is Hebron." It is easy to understand how a new town might grow up round the sacred site, while the original one would disappear. The neighbourhood is exceedingly fertile and the valley has been supposed to be that of Eshcol from the luxuriance with which the vines thrive there. But this site should more probably be looked for in the mountain plateau south of Judaea, which now forms part of the Desert of the Tih, but which must in former times have been as fertile as Palestine itself. There, although all is now arid and bare from the failure of the water supply, there are the ruins of immense works for irrigation, and the terraced hillsides are covered with small stone heaps in regular order, which are still called Teleilat el 'Anab, or " grape-mounds." The grapes of Hebron are large, and the clusters grow to an immense size. There is a tradition that it was here that Father Noah planted the vine ; his grave is shown at Dura, the ancient Dora, a little to the west. The town of Hebron contains four quarters : Haret esh Sheikh, " the sheikh's quarter," so called from the fine mosque of Sheikh 'Ali Bakka on the north-west, which dates from the time of the Mamelukes (see page 197) ; Haret Bab ez Zawiyeh, " the quarter of the Cloister Gate," on the west; Haret el Haram, " the quarter of the Sanctuary," on the south-east; and Haret el Musharikeh, " the common quarter," on the south. The population is from eight thousand to ten thousand, of whom five hundred are Jews. These are the only foreigners permitted in the place ; they exercise no trade or industry, but subsist on the charity of their European co-religionists, for whom they offer up prayers in return at this peculiarly holy place.* On approaching the city, the first object which meets the eye is the square castle-like structure of the Haram, with its towering walls of ancient and massive masonry (see steel plate). These, as already stated, enclose the mosque which now covers the cave of Machpelah. According to Jewish opinion, it was Solomon who first erected the mausoleum, Esther who restored it, and the Empress Helena who rebuilt it after it had been destroyed or fallen into decay. The walls of the Haram at Hebron are the most perfect examples of masonry of the kind which exist in Palestine, almost surpassing even the ancient portions of the walls of * There is an important and anciently founded glass factory on the north side of the Haram; here lamps and smooth rings of coloured glass, worn as bracelets, are made in great numbers, and distributed all over the country. Hebron supplies the southern districts with water- skins made of goats' hides; and there are a few primitive hand-looms in the town, where strong rough carpets are produced.—M. E