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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 191
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 191. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 191. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/247

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 191, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 191
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_213.jpg
Transcript THE SOUTH COUNTRY OF JUDjEA. 191 especially the flora of the wilderness or midbar, " the highland downs," as contrasted with the lowland plains. During the ride we descend from Tekoa-which is two thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight feet above the sea—two thousand one hundred and twenty-eight feet to the cliff over Engedi (see page 205), which, though only six hundred and sixty feet higher than the Mediterranean, yet overlooks the Dead Sea immediately beneath from a height of all but two thousand feet (see page 204). On the way we see here and there traces of ancient beacon stations. One of these may have been that " watch-tower in the wilderness," the wilderness of Jeruel, mentioned in Jehoshaphat's history (2 Chronicles xx.). But of the name Jeruel we have found no trace in the Arabic nomenclature, though this must be the region, as it lay between Tekoa and Engedi. But of Hazziz, the cliff of Ziz, we have the equivalent in El Hasasah, the tableland just before the pass. The pass itself is not recognisable till we are close upon it. It is simply a zigzao- path, chiefly artificial, but occasionally aided by nature, cut out of the sides of the precipices, at the inner edge of a semicircular wall of cliff, which, spanning a chord of about one and a half miles, embraces a horse-shoe plain, which gently slopes to the shore and forms a sub-tropical oasis. This pass and cliff have been, from the days of Chedorlaomer and Abraham, the one ascent by which invaders from the south and east entered the hill country of Judaea. As far as Engedi they could march by the shore without any obstacle; north of it the shore line is impracticable, even for footmen, and there are no paths by which beasts could be led up. 1 lad they taken any of the openings south of Engedi this must have entailed a long march across a rough and almost waterless wilderness. The trade between Jerusalem and Kerak in Moab is still carried on by this route, by which also the salt is brought from Jebel Usdum. Few landscapes are more impressive than the sudden unfolding of the Dead Sea basin, and its eastern wall, from the top of the pass of Engedi (see pages 200 and 201). The whole length of the lake may here be taken in one view ; the opposite hills are veiled in a delicate haze, the evaporation from the sea clothing the mountain-sides with a gauzy pink, and the tops with as gauzy and light a blue. We wind down the zigzag niche which serves for a path. After descending more than one thousand two hundred feet, there is a break in the cliff. It becomes a rugged slope for the next six hundred feet, and at the base of a rock, the copious warm fresh " Fountain of the Kid" (En-gedi or 'Ain-Jidy)* bursts forth amidst an oasis of tropical vegetation (see page 203), and then, kid-like, skips from rock to rock, till it reaches the plain below. From the level at which this spring gushes out of the cliff there are evidences of the most careful system of irrigation, carried round the little amphitheatre at different levels, in the days when the palm, the camphire, and the sugar-cane brought in rich revenues to the possessors of the oasis. It is still the home of many of the choicest and most peculiar plants, birds, and insects of the Dead Sea shore. The camphire still lingers. The fine and striking * The ancient name of Engedi ('Ain-Jidy) was Hazezon-tamar, "the pruning of the palm" (Genesis xiv. 7). There is no doubt about this identification, for, in 2 Chronicles xx. 2, the place is referred to as » Hazazon-tamar, which is Engedi." The vineyards and camphire of Engedi are mentioned in the Song of Solomon, and Pliny praises its palm-trees, which, according to Josephus, were of "the best kind » (Ant. ix. i, | a) , he also alludes to its precious balsam, «' opobalsamum." In the time of Eusebius « Engaddi " was still a place of importance, and its position, " east of Hebron," is described by the Arab historian, Mejr ed Din, who wrote towards the end of the fifteenth century.-M. E. R. M