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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 190
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 190. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/246.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 190. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/246

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 190, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/246.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 190
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_212.jpg
Transcript lgo PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. by pursuing the mountain track parallel to this along the crest of the ridge towards Tekoa. and then descending at once on Berachah. West of this ridge there is general cultivation; the tern slopes are for the most part bare downs, with sparse stunted shrubs, pastured over bv the Ta'amireh Arabs, abounding in partridge, and the favourite haunt of the gazelle and a or \\ lid goats. From the Wady Bereikuh a ride of five miles brings us to Tekoa (see page [88), ere.. the little upland plain, ensconced in a circle of hills, called Bukat et Tekua. In front of us long hill, with a copious spring at its foot and ruins on its top. The name is scarcely change Teku'a for Tekoa, and the district in its natural features seems to have been always what it is now bare, treeless, Open pasturage. We here lose all traces of the ancient terraces which I the undulations of every hill farther west with their swathing bands. Here and then still patches of cultivation in the hollows of the valleys, but the soil is dry and stony, and u<- begin here to lose the rich vegetable mould which, however scanty, still covers more thr whole of the central hills, and have, in its stead, only a thirsty chalky marl. That V( soil is doubtless due, in the first instance, to the primaeval forest, which certainl whole of the [udaean as of the Gilead range!, but which has left no traces of its exist on the western slopes towards the Dead Sea (see page 185). Tekoa thus stood on the outskirts of civilisation. Though a city, and a fortified one, for its strategic importance is evident, and it was the permanent advanced post towards the pass of Engedi (see page 200), yet it is not with a number of low ruin topped knolls, like the strongholds of the country we have I \ng. Asa town it stood in the centre of a nomad district, and the inhabitants oi the ;tward dwelt in tents like their modern successors, the Taamireh Arabs. Hut til alwa\ rison post is indicated by the words, k> Blow the trumpet in Tekoa, and setup ;n of tire in Beth-Haccerim M (i.e. Frank Mountain, or Jebel Fureidis, the peak facing US the; north) 137, vol. i.). Tekoa was fortified by Rehoboam as one of his frontier posts. Of its large buildings little remains that can be identified; but it was occupied du; the Christian <ra. and the most conspicuous ruin is that of the Byzantine church, with the broken columns of its aisles, and a large baptismal font well wrought in hard limest< page [88). St. Saba established a convent here; and the Crusaders resettled the place, only be again, after their expulsion from the country, devastated by the Bedawin. lint the chief interest of Tekoa is not its history, but the fact of its being the birthplace and home n\ the prophet Amos, a "herdsman of Tekoa" and a " gatherer of wild f ly life here, the character ^\ the country, and the nature of his calling, hai ll,s writingswith an individuality which hasattracted the notice of every student and critic, thx St Jerome, the father of commentators, downwards. From rekoa to Engedi (see pag l there is no track, but we may follow th< the w.uK 1 which converge towards the pass, the Wady Husasah, Wady el jihar. or Wady I eijeh All are equally featureless, all alike without relics of the past, or dwelling* «»« lh< ■ent llll! ! them afford an admirable opportunity for studying the natural prodtK