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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 187
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 187. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 187. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/243

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 187, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 187
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_209.jpg
Transcript THE SOUTH COUNTRY OF JUD&A. l8? or tanks. The most important of the two is the lower pool, a square tank of very ancient masonry, massive and finely wrought, one hundred and thirty-two feet square, and some fifty feet deep (see page 196). Its supply never fails, being derived from subterranean conduits, which seem also to supply a similar but rather smaller pool of like antiquity, higher up on the north edge of the city. It was over this lower pool, according to consentient tradition, that David hanged the murderers of his rival Ishbosheth, and set an example of magnanimity to foes and of stern justice rarely witnessed in the struggles of Oriental monarchs. The history of Hebron—with the single exception of the seven and a half years during which it was the capital of David's southern kingdom, before the fall of Ishbosheth enabled him to unite Israel at Jerusalem—presents scarcely an event worthy of note, since the days of Abraham ; with memorials of whom the whole neighbourhood abounds. The only two undoubted monuments of the past, the Haram and the Pools, are, we have seen, connected with these epochs respectively. To the Jew, though he clings to it, the memories are bitter as well as hallowed. For it was close to Hebron, at a spot if possible even more hallowed than Machpelah itself—under the oak of Mamre (see page 189), where Abraham had so often pitched his tent, where he conversed with God, and where he received the promises to himself and to his seed—that, after the great revolt of the Jews had been finally suppressed ai Bether, the Emperor Hadrian sold tens of thousands of hapless captives to a slavery worse than death itself. The site of Mamre, now known as Ramet el Khulil (see page 189), is about two miles north of Hebron, a little to the right of the road to Jerusalem. It was once a Roman road, carefully paved, as perhaps it had been in the days of royal Solomon, but certainly it is worse now than it could have been when it was but a mountain path, along which Abraham may ha\ e often passed to visit his friends at Hebron. The place is identified on the authority of Jerome, and must have been well known in his days, and the Jews have always looked on it and reverenced it as the home of Abraham. There is nothing to mark the place till we reach it a small flat plain extends to the foot of the hills half a mile off, without a tree or a shrub, and only some few dilapidated fences where patches of vegetables have been cultivated. Here we find several deep wells, three of them carefully faced with dressed stone, and evidently very ancient. By the largest of them- are two lines of an unfinished enclosure, at right angles, two hundred feet and one hundred and sixty feet respectively in length, and built of very large square stones, but without a marginal draft. There remain only two courses, three and four feet high respectively, and some of the stones fifteen feet in length. It is impossible to discover the object of this building, if indeed it were ever finished, for there are very few traces of debris to be seen around. It cannot have been the basilica which Constantine erected here, for a little farther to the east the foundations of a large Byzantine church can be easily traced. It may have been the enclosure by the great terebinth, which had become before the time of Constantine a place of worship both for Christians and heathens, and under which Hadrian sold the captive Jews. A great terebinth existed here as late as the fourth