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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 183
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 183. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 31, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 183. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/238

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 183, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 31, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 183
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_204.jpg
Transcript THE SOUTH COUNTRY OF JUD/EA. l8„ the valley narrows to a watercourse a few feet wide, the hills are steeper and steeper, and the path a goat-track occasionally varied by a flight of broken natural stairs. Several ancient wells, shaded by a tree on the wayside, still supply the traveller with water; and just above one of these are the ruins of Keilah, still known by the same name, dreary and unattractive, and with no decipherable remains, yet once the head-quarters of David, and then a fenced city. It is a strong natural situation, and a few men might hold the pass. There is little to detain us on the rest of the way to Hebron. Hharass is passed on the right. The road still ascends till we reach an irregular mountain plateau, about six miles north-west of Hebron, and after crossing it, descend no longer bare hills, with brushwood and pasturage, but carefully enclosed and cultivated vineyards, with clumps of olive and fig yards. We are now in what is popularly known as the Vale of Eschol (see page 192), though the true Eschol must be placed many days' journey to the south, near Kadesh Barnea. As we approach the environs of Hebron, on the left of the paved and walled road, a wide gateway leads through some vineyards to a large building, the Russian hospice, erected just behind a very fine old tree, the traditional oak of Mamre (see page 193). For at least three hundred years this tree, which is not a terebinth (elah)} but an ilex, or evergreen holm oak (Quercus pseudo-coccifera), has been visited by pilgrims and known as Abraham's oak. That, however, was in another place, Ramet or Mamre, and was a terebinth. It has long since gone, and this noble tree will soon follow, for within the last twenty-five years it has lost more than half its limbs, and is rapidly sinking into decrepitude (see pages 192 and 193). It used to spread its shadow over a circumference of one hundred yards, and its trunk measures thirty-two feet in circumference at a height of six feet from the ground. One mile farther and we are at Hebron (see page 197), or rather in front of it, for the road runs alongside the long straggling suburb of Esh Shekh, and then passing to the south of the central quarter El Haram, we halt on the slope facing the city, by the Mohammedan cemetery, with the pools of Hebron directly below us, and the famous mosque in front, behind the buildings of the city. Hebron, though it stands higher above the sea than any other city of Palestine, is yet one of the very few ancient sites which is not on, but under, a hill. The ancient city may have been a little more to the north-west, but the pools (see page 196) as well as the Haram fix the variations within narrow limits. A wide open grassy space extends south and west, surrounded by olive-clad hills. The central and conspicuous feature of Hebron is the great Haram wall (see steel plate). It is an oblong enclosure about two hundred feet by one hundred and fifteen, and fifty-eight feet high, surrounding the cave of Machpelah, the burial-place of Abraham and his family for three generations. The ground on which it stands is very steep, and was possibly below or " before " the ancient city, which claims to be one of the oldest in the world, built, as we are told, seven years before Zoan, the classical 1 ams (a date which has not yet been ascertained), and coeval with Shechem and Damascus. Besides its own antiquity, it embraces here the most ancient and the most authentic of all the holy places of the Holy Land. Much controversy has arisen as to the date of this wall. Beyond