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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 174
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 174. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/229.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 174. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/229

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 174, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/229.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 174
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_195.jpg
Transcript , 7 , PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. -nr hence to the north, SO as to enter the town by that side, and in so doing visit a site which may aid in identifying the place Khtirbet Gat. The name is well known and reco-ni^d by the fellahin, who point out the hill to the north-west of Beit Jibrin, full of old foundations, and well adapted for a fort* Gat Of this more anon. No place in South Judaea contain* so many and such varied remains as Beit Jibrin. The modern town is of some extent, though shrunken indeed within its ancient limits. There are, perhaps, one thousand inhabitants, of a different type from the fellahin, large-made, muscular, bold and insolent, but industrious and enterprising, and comparatively rich. The father of the present sheikh, Azazeh, was a ul, del. int of Turkish authority, the terror alike of his own people and of the country around. I he ire told of him surpass in bloody crime even the hideous tales of Je r h) p |( If he heard of a man having married a handsome wife he would send the couple, and, if the hapless girl pleased him, would cut clown the husband without a and tell her that as she was now a widow he should take her. It is only since his death that lers from Hebron | fce page 196) or travellers have ventured here. The sheikh's castle near the ancient fortress, and built of its materials (see page 177). The old citadel, round which the modern town clusters, has been enclosed by a wall of massive masonry, ami is probably Crusading, as polished shafts and marble capitals of the (ineco-Roman period .1 built into the walls, and many broken columns are still standing in situ in the COUrtyardl the modern hovels. The citadel has been about six hundred feet square, and round the walls on the inside were rows of arched vaults, many of which arc still perfect and inhabited. In the centre <>f the area is the Crusading keep of similar masonry, but which has n partially ruined, r< I by die Saracens, and now again a ruin, with massive arched chambers, and a splendid crypt chapel, the groined roof of which still remains. Not tin: l< Interesting and useful relic of the past is a noble well, probably Roman, of unusual dianv d with most beautiful masonry, and apparently about onv hundred feet deep, still affording an abundant supply of water. These are the remains of Ileto-Gabra, the "house of Gabriel" Syro-Greek name, changed by the Romans to Eleutheropolis, which, though now compfc lost, was retained as late as the beginning of the ninth century, when the Saracens desl d it. Though fell 1 a short day's journey to the north (see page [61), Is a more favourite mant for the honour, I have always inclined to the belief, when I look at the massive and certainly Crusading masonry, that this is not only Beto-Gabra and Eleutheropolis, but also the Blanchegarde of ihe Crusaders, the celebrated outpost, which is surrounded by a ha! e from the heroic and almost miraculous adventures and single-handed feats of OUT own lion hearted Id Round it circle the most romantic of the tales of the Crusa es Safy then' is scarcel) u ^f a ruin, however strong the natural position, and if 1 walls be not Blanch , what are they? We observed one very Interesting relic which ma] I hint as to the antiquity of the place. Lying near a well, a little outside the vi. rinthiant capital in the style of the best period, but In theo ' the cornice, instead iA^ the acanthus leaf, was sculptured the seven golden candlesticks, exactly ol