Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 171
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 171. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/225.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 171. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/225

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 171, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/225.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 171
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_191.jpg
Transcript THE SOUTH COUNTRY OF JUD&A. 171 push forward into the Philistian plain. Between two of these spurs we ride, and on our left is a low " tell," with stones strewn about in all directions. This is all that is left of Lachish. The hill seems almost formed of broken pottery, which covers the ground like gravel. A few half-choked wells and lines of foundations of very thick walls are all that is left to tell of the city, whose capture forms the chief feature of Sennacherib's slabs. There the city is represented as surrounded by palm-trees. Now not a tree or a shrub remains for miles distant. Commanding the country around, and secure by its situation from surprise, the farthest elevation projecting into the plain, it is the natural position for a frontier outpost fortress. Three miles farther on, on a similar "tell," we reach Ajlan, the ancient Eglon, a simple repetition of Lachish, but much better preserved. The whole enceinte of the keep can be easily traced, now a field of onions protected by a cactus hedge. Several wells and an old cistern remain, and some excavations, recently made, have brought to light some: fine substructures of dressed stone, attesting its former importance. Two hours' ride from Eglon, across a level plain, brings us to Arak el Menshlyeh, tin- ancient Libnah. A wide valley from the south winds round the spur of Eglon, and we are soon on a rich corn plain again. Far ahead we can see an isolated rock, with a white wely in one corner, standing up out of the plain, and a large mud village at its foot. This is Libnah. Just to the north-east of the village, separated from it by a narrow stream, close by which are several ancient wells, with fragments of sculptured marble strewn around, and surmounted by the rude and cumbrous apparatus for lifting the water, such as we see in Egypt, rises die rock Arak el Menshiyeh, on which was the citadel of the Jewish town. It had originally been a completely isolated rock, intended by nature for a fortress, absolutely impregnable before the introduction of firearms. Its perpendicular sides stand out from the plain without the slightest connection with any neighbouring ridge, and about one hundred feet high. The old rubbish of former buildings has been thrown down the south side, and forms a steep slope, by which we climb to the top. This is perfectly flat, about four acres in extent, and utterly deserted, forming a fig orchard surrounded by a cactus hedge. The panorama all around for miles is unbroken. The whole plain is corn or pasture, not a shrub or tree, not a house, not a feature to break the green expanse, save here and there a Bedawin encampment, with fires beginning to twinkle in the distance as the shades of evening creep on. It is an impressive sight, and we can picture how the host of the Assyrians marched from the distant ridge of Lachish, and were spread over this wide plain, and how impossible was the capture of this place, even by such an army, otherwise than by starvation. Hence the beleaguered garrison looked down on the plain to the west and saw the whole strewn with the thousands of corpses smitten by the angel of the Lord : " For the angel of death spread his wings on the blast, And breathed on the face of the foe as he passed, And the eyes of the sleepers wax'd deadly and chill, And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever were still." From Arak el Menshiyeh the route to Beit Jibrin (see page 180) is for the most part