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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 166
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 166. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/220.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 166. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/220

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 166, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/220.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 166
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_186.jpg
Transcript 156 PICTi fRESQl rE PA PL SPIN P. n on th- Godfrey invested Ascalon with five thousand cavalry and infantry. while I an< red and tl. directed the attack upon the enemy. dlantly the Christiana charged their swarthy antagonists, who exceeded them greatly in numbers. h jg tted that large tl- p and herds of cattle accompanied the Christians from the and these were mistaken by the Mohammedans for the Christian reserve for apparently SO numerous that when the first collision took place a panic arose among them ,lI](| ip, in all dir . hotly pursued by the Christians. Some tied to th and were there put to death by Raymond, while others perished in the desert. I portion attempted to ..ape into Ascalon, but were intercepted b) Godfrey and killed. the destruction of this vast arm) Godfre) n<>w laid siege to Ascalon, but was in a short tim. ed t<> raise ^ n in consequence of the quarrels among his knights, and tlon still remained in the hands of the Mohammedans, a standing menace to Jerusalem. In \.i>. i 121 the Mohammedans made an ineffectual raid from Ascalon upon Jerusalem, while the Christian endeavouring to subdue Tyre It was not until a.m. 115;, that alon w n from the Mohammedans. Then Baldwin III. laid siege to it, determined tpture it at all hazards; he completely invested the fortress both by sea and land, and two months carried on - perations. During this period he omitted to ol.s, the l.,i tivali and ordered all the pilgrims in the land to hasten to the the inv( I lie Mohammedans defended the walls with the utmost gallantry, and when at la a the) were obliged to submit the) were enabled to make their own terms and march out of the ith all the honours of war. In a few years th. of Christendom languished, and under the leadership ot' Sultan Saladin the followers of Islam recaptured many of the cities of Syria Anion- others alon was the last to capitulate previous to the march of the Mohammedans upon Jerusalem I \.i>. 1 187), In 1 [91 Saladin determined to destroy the fortifications of Ascalon. lest it should lin fall into the hands of the Christians; accordingly, under his directions, this ma-nit: I became in a short time a heap of ruins (see page 169). During the Third Crusade the walls iA Ascalon were rebuilt by the Christians, in which work Richard Plantagenet took a ial in* es being defrayed by a subscription from the ladies ot ;land. In th- 70 the walls were again totally destroyed by the Sultan Biba The walls nf Ascalon I standing in pla but they are of small si of indurated sandstone; here and there maybe seen remains of the massive bl< Which formed the old walls, which \\n' the most part have been carried away for the building ofothei Column enteen to eighteen feet in length and 1 1 a half in diamet to be seen projecting from the | f the walls. Ascalon is still 1 a -a t in a small wa\ (see pi >, auA exports bones and pottery. The neighbourhood of palm 11 1 picturesque aspect to the plao l main kii fruit, including apples, are cultivated b) the inhabitant I'd Jurah. a small village north -up ofruihs now (ailed 'Askulan.