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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 163
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 163. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 163. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/217

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 163, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/217.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 163
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_183.jpg
Transcript PHILISTIA. l63 Akiba acknowledged him as the Messiah. The revolt commenced in a.d. 130. Jews flocked to his standard from all parts of the world; the whole Hebrew race was in a state of ferment at the news of his advent. Barcochaba advanced against the Romans at the head of a larae body of insurgents, and at first was constantly successful ; he even captured Jerusalem, and held it for the space of three years. It is said that he was at the head of an army of two hundred thousand fighting men, and though this is probably an exaggeration, it is worthy of note that Strabo states that so great was the population about Jabneh, that this district in his time could furnish forty thousand fighting men. It is not necessary to follow the fortunes of Barcochaba, and to watch how quickly the star of this false Messiah set for ever, until even his name was changed by his aggrieved and despairing countrymen to that of Barcosba (the Son of a Lie). At the termination of this unsuccessful revolt the whole of the Rabbins of Jabneh were barbarously persecuted by the Romans, as the ringleaders of the insurrection, and were forbidden to fill up the vacancies in the Sanhedrin, an order which they managed to evade. After the death of Hadrian, and on the accession of the gentle Antoninus, the Rabbins were emboldened to re-establish their synagogues and to re-open the school at Jabneh (Jamnia), but in consequence of the indiscretion of the rabbi, Simon Ben Jochai, in speaking evil of the Roman authorities, the school was suppressed and the Sanhedrin wandered to other places in Palestine. Benjamin of Tudela asserts that even in his day (a.d. 1163), the site of these schools could still be traced. During the time of the Crusades a fort was here established called Ibelin, the site being admirably adapted for a work of defence. Jabneh became the site of a bishopric, and its medieeval church is now converted into a Mohammedan mosque (see page 162). This ancient site (called by the Arabs Yabneh) is now occupied by a flourishing town, numbering about two thousand inhabitants, principally Mohammedans, and on the coast, at a distance of four miles, is still to be seen the remains of the ancient port or Maju-ma of Jabneh, mentioned by Pliny. If we turn to the south from this port and traverse the sea-coast there is little of interest for some miles. The rich lands of Philistia for three to four miles inland are covered to a depth of thirty to forty feet with ever-increasing heights of sand dunes, blown eastward by the sea breeze, and threatening ere long to engulf the whole lowland districts if steps are not taken to obviate the growing evil. It is a truly melancholy sight, when travelling over this once densely populated country, to find little remaining save here and there a fellah's solitary hut, surrounded by walls of sand which have from day to day to be battled and wrestled with. With wonderful tenacity of purpose these fellahin continue the struggle until at last they are driven out of the inheritance of their forefathers. In some cases the sand has so far got the upper hand that nothing is left of the cultivated lands, the most strenuous labour being only sufficient to preserve a few remaining fruit trees from the general destruction. These are to be seen each at the bottom of a crater of sand, laden with delicious fruit. After proceeding about eleven miles along the coast a sandstone town or barrack is met