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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 158
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 158. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/212.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 158. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/212

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 158, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/212.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 158
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_178.jpg
Transcript i58 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. the left (see page 159), it narrows considerably, and winds in and out through a somewhat narrow gorge for some miles until it enters the more open plain near Tell es Safy. Tuj. Valley of Elah (or the Terebinth) at the present day contains, near Shocoh (Shuweikeh) one of the largest terebinth-trees in Palestine, fifty-five feet in height, with a spread of shade seventy-five feet in diameter, and a trunk seventeen feet in circumference (see page 159). The bottom of this valley, near Shocoh, is a fine fertile plain, cultivated as corn-fields, and h< : was that the encounter between David and Goliath took place, the Philistines standing on a mountain on one side, and Israel on a mountain on the other, with the valley between them The people of Israel came down from the mountains and were to the north-east, while the Philistines concentrating from the plains were on the south-west, army against army in battle array. Gath, famous for its giants, had given to the Philistines a champion called Goliath, ten foci in height, clad in a coat of mail, with a helmet of brass, and the staff of his spear was like a weaver's beam ; and the spear's head weighed six hundred shekels of iron. lor forty days wen* these two armies face to face, and for forty days did Goliath call to the armies of Israel, " I defy the armies of Israel this day; give me a man, that we may fight together.91 And all Israel were greatly afraid, for a champion who could cope with Goliath was unknown ( 1 Samuel xvii.). While the people of Israel were u dismayed and greatly afraid," there arrived in camp the youthful David, who, when he had heard of the challenge of Goliath, asked what should be done for the man who killed the Philistine, and took away the reproach from Israel, and was told in reply that the king would enrich him and give him his daughter, and make his fathers h free in Israel. And David was brought before Saul and offered to fight with the Philistine. Now in this personal combat, thus contemplated, there was not only the danger to the li: David to be considered, but also to the whole people of Israel, for if the Philistine conqw they were to be servants to the Philistines. The consequences were, therefore, so momentous that Saul required a pledge as to David's ability and prowess. David recounted his adventures with a lion and a bear, in each of which combats he was victorious, and Saul admitted his claim to act as champion, and bid him go against the Philistine. This circumstance shows clearly that the people of Israel were on the verge of a panic, on the point of giving in, otherwise thej would not have so desperately adventured their safety to a comparatively unknown champion, to a youth totally unversed in the arts of war ; but it also shows us something more they permitted 1 >avid to go to the encounter without armour, and knew that he was about to enter the lists trusting in the assistance of the God of Israel. It is clear from this that the people as a body still thoroughly believed in their God, and trusted to David as His instrument: 44 And David put his hand in his bag, and took thence a stone, and slang it, and smote the Philistine in his forehead, and slew him. And when the Philistines saw their champion was dead, they fled ; and the Israelites pursued them even to Gath and Ekron, and Spoiled thci tents." At the present day the account of this victory of David can be read and studiec on the spot, and all the incidents realised; for the ancient sites are still in existence, a