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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 151
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 151. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/205.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 151. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/205

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 151, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/205.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 151
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_171.jpg
Transcript ■MMHHHI PHILISTIA. ,5, in breadth, bordering on the sea-coast, elevated from fifty to one hundred feet above the sea-level, and consisting of a series of undulations without distinctive features, composed of the richest alluvial deposit. Here were built and flourished Ekron, Jabneh (see page 162), Migdol (see page 167), Ashdod (see page 165), Ascalon (see page 169), and Gaza (see page 175), cities well fortified and situated on eminences, and dedicated to the worship of the ancient fish-gods. Between this undulating country and the mountains or hill country of Judah, is the hilly country of Philistia, stretching from north to south, and about twelve to fifteen miles wide. It consists of a series of hills and spurs from five hundred to eight hundred feet above the sea-level, broken through by broad valleys, and is distinct from the hill country of Judah, where the mountains rise to a height of two thousand to three thousand feet, and overhang Philistia. In this district, as has already been stated, the productive soil has been washed away with the terraces from the hillsides into the valleys, leaving vast extents of bare rock; but even yet the country is not abandoned, and the fellahin, when not too closely ground down under Turkish rule, carefully and successfully cultivate here and there the portions left uninjured (see page 160). It is, in a great measure, due to the desolating rule of the nations which have held sway in Palestine for so many centuries, that we are enabled at the present time to re so many of the ancient sites mentioned in the books relating the conquest of the country by the Israelites more than three thousand years ago. Instead of being the "battle-field of nations," had this country existed for any lengthened period under a settled form of government and been allowed to develop its resources and prosper, it is probable that all records of the far-distant past would long ere this have been swept away; but, owing to the state of poverty in which the country has continued, very slight changes have taken place, with the exception of a general decay. The descendants of the original inhabitants still linger about the ancient sites and ruins, and preserve their ancient traditions, so that it is practicable at the present da)- to go through the land, Bible in hand, and identify the places there mentioned. This is more especially the case with regard to places of minor importance, such as the ancient second-rate towns in Philistia, for very little has occurred to cause any change in their sites, while on the other hand the chief towns, such as Gath (see page 161), Ascalon (see page 169), and Gaza (see page 175), have been subject to many sieges, and to the usual fortunes of war. In many instances the stones of the ancient towns have been taken by the fellahin and burnt into lime (see page 184), or carried off to other sites, as in the case of Ascalon, whence many shiploads of cut and carved stones were taken for the rebuilding of 'Akka (see page 76) and Saida (see page 45), but, as a general rule, the remains of the cities are still to be found on the spot, covered with rubbish or built into the walls of the peasants' houses. At the foot of the mountain-wall of Judah, just beyond the north-eastern extremity of the hills of Philistia, is still to be seen the site of Zorah, the birthplace of Samson, the son of Manoah. This place is now called Sur'ah (see page 149); it is on the northern bank of the Wady es Sur'ar, the head of the river called Nahr Rubin (see map).