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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 150
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 150. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/204.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 150. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/204

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 150, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/204.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 150
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_170.jpg
Transcript wmammmmmmmmmimi^mmmmi I5o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. supremacy the Philistines were great in power and occupied the sea-board from Jaffa to G with the ports or majumas of Jabneh (see page 162), Ashdod (see page 165), Ascalon e 173), and Gaza (see page 175), and at one time even held the people of Israel in subjection, and would naturally assert themselves owners of the inland territory to those tradinp on their coasts. The land of the Philistines, at the time of the conquest of Canaan by die Israelites, extended from Ekron ('Akir) on the north to Gaza on the south (see map), from the hoard on the west to the mountains on the east, and was usually called Shephelath or the Low Country. At that time the Philistines appear to have been on very friendly terms with the Anakim of the mountains and with the other nations of Canaan, and to have joined them in withstanding the incursions of the Israelites. That the Philistines alone wer in offering a continued and strenuous resistance, is probably due to their possession of h< and chariots, which they could use to advantage on the plains, and which their antagonists did not possess in any number. The whole of Philistia was in those days highly cultivated and most productive, and renowned for its vast unbroken expanses of luxuriant corn, and groves of fruit-trees and vineyards; and even to the present day the land still enjoys a reputation for productive and exports corn to foreign countries, though its breadth of production is very much narrowed, for on the sea-board the drift sand has been allowed to encroach and cover the land for some miles inland, engulfing the site of many an ancient city. This encroachment of sand from the sea-shore is a most serious evil, and every year threatens more and more the fertile plain. Already many miles of rich country have been devoured by this insatiable monster, and then- is no Perseusat hand to deliver Andromeda. Gaza (see page 175) and Ashdod (seepage 165) are threatened and will in a few years be overcome, while their ancient ports have long since disappeared. The method of progress of this silent sea monster is plainly visible. The w\ of the coast now consists of sand dunes sloping at an angle of ten degrees in the direction <>t the prevailing south-west wind, and presenting a slope of about thirty to thirty-five dej to the north-east or on the leeward side, and when the prevailing wind is blowing the sand may be seen gently working up the windward incline, and, on arriving at the summit of the dune, swiftly falling to the bottom, from thence again to ascend another gentle slope, moving onwards towards the interior. On the eastern side of Philistia another enemy has laid waste the country and dc its ancient fertility, for there the hills have been denuded of their soil until nothing is left but the bare rock; year after year the terraces supporting the vineyards and fruit-trees have be allowed to fall away, and the rich red loamy soil has been washed down until the hillsides are bare and desolate. At the bottoms of these valleys are still narrow slips ot fertile grouiu which yield in abundance, when they are not deluged by torrents from the unclothed hlllSK or too greatly scon hed by the glare from the overhanging rocks. Philistia is not by any means the uniformly level tract it is generally supposed to may be said to be divided into two portions: first, the undulating plains, about twehe