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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 147
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 147. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/201.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 147. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/201

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 147, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/201.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 147
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_167.jpg
Transcript LYDDA AND RAMLEH. 147 The desolation of the plain of Sharon is at present due to want of a stable and organized government. It is still well watered, it still counts its forests, and the sea-sand has not greatly encroached upon its borders; its soil is most fertile, and its people are able and willing to till the land, were they not ground down and hindered by the rapacious officials who are sent periodically to take from them their gains, under one pretext or another. These people are a rural race whose sympathies are evidently not with their Turkish rulers, but rather with the Egyptians, with whom, as in days of yore, they still keep up a close connection, not a few having been down to work on the Suez Canal. Like the Egyptians, they have raised the fruitful groves surrounding their habitations by the sweat of their brow. Irrigation is necessary to keep them in a flourishing condition, and this is kept up by means of water ever flowing from wells nearly one hundred feet in depth, the water-wheels (see page 138) of which are worked by contributions of animals, camels, horses, mules, oxen, donkeys, from the families in the villages, according to their wealth and breadth of lands. Let us descend the tower and visit Ludd, the ancient Lydda, by moonlight. Passing over fields of ranunculus, anemones, saffrons, and other wild flowers now closed, we burst through a line of tall bushy reeds and grasses, startling a heron into flight, and sec in front of us, on a flash of water, the beautiful ruins of Lydda, the city of our patron saint, St. George, held in honour both by Mohammedans and Christians. The church, the ruins of which were until lately so picturesque, has passed through many vicissitudes (see page 145). As early A.d. 315 we know it to have existed here, the site of a bishopric, and dedicated to St. George, whose remains are said to be interred beneath. This church was destroyed in tin: eighth century by the Saracens, and again rebuilt by the Crusaders, again destroyed by Saladin and rebuilt by Richard Cceur de Lion. But it is not only as a Christian site that Lydda is of interest -unlike the modern Ramleh, Lydda can lay claim to our interest as an ancient site; not, however, rendered conspicuous until the time of the apostles. Here it was that Saint Peter healed the paralytic one, and here he was staying when he was sent for to Joppa (see page 137), nine miles distant, at the time of the death of Tabitha. It assumed the name of Diospolis (City of Zeus) about the time of Hadrian, and only gradually, through the lapse of centuries, regained its original name. Forcing our way over vast quantities of segs or flags, and scarcely escaping the thorns of the prickly pear, we ascend the swelling hills and find ourselves among the ruins of 'Amwas (the ancient Emmaus, afterwards called Nicopolis), with Latron in the distance (see page 152). Emmaus is mentioned in the book of Maccabees, and also by F. Josephus as being a place of note in the time of the Asmoneans, and it was in sight of this city that Jonathan Maccabeus defeated the Syrian army. It must not, however, be confounded with Emmaus of Luke xxiv. 13, though Dr. Robinson was in favour of this supposition. (Refer to pages 198 et seq., vol. L, where the subject of the site of Emmaus is fully treated.) "Amwas is now merely a squalid village with a ruined church. From here we can see the new carriage road winding up the highlands to Jerusalem.