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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 146
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 146. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 146. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/200

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 146, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/200.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 146
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_166.jpg
Transcript I46 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Though yet early in the year, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone. " The flov appear on the earth, the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land. The fig-tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grapes give a good smell.,, The fragrance from the orange-groves is wafted on the breeze the last lowing of cattle and bleating of sheep returning to their folds fill the air with a pleasant sound—darkness and quiet are spreading over the land. The soil is still moist with the winter rains, not yet licked up by the dry easterly winds, and lagoons and sheets of water flash back the splendour of the setting sun. Abundant verdure, both corn and weeds, covers the rich loam, and when swayed by the breeze displays glints of crimson from the millions of anemone, the roses of Sharon, which lie shrouded among the lengthening grasses. The whole goodly plain of Sharon is visible- from Mount Carmel on the north down to Lydda, from the eastern hills to the blue sea, now bathed in gold—a wilderness of weeds and thorn brakes, and yet a very paradise of colour and ever-varying beauty. Sharon was lovely in days gone by, when every acre was cultivated and teeming with an abundant population; it is yet lovely during the land's long holiday, at this time of year, before the fervid summer heat has parched up the land and reduced the plain to a barren waste. Yet ascend the tower once again in the autumn and a different prospect presents itself Far and wide the olive-groves have become dull and lustreless from the accumulation of dust, the mulberry leaves have disappeared, used as food for the sheep. The soil is parched up and dry, all verdure has departed, even the stalks of corn have cracked up and fled away on the wind, and there is left a sky of brass and earth of iron. Trees and houses quiver in the heated atmosphere, camels in the distance are seen with their bodies separated from their legs, in grotesque confusion, and there are sudden glimpses of oases in stony places, beautiful sheets of water and green trees where it is known to be only parched-up land. The villages, which so few weeks ago were thronged with mountaineers assisting in the lowland harvest, are now denuded of their normal inhabitants, who in their turn have ascended the hills to assist their neighbours. The corn has long since been harvested, thrashed, winnowed, and heaped up; the Government has taken its share, the landowners have taken theirs, the money usurers theirs, and what is left to the villages is now safely housed in the boxes made of cow-dung which serve for barns, and the people know what are their slender means for the coming year. They are a frugal race, who do their best to keep body and soul together—with very moderate success, for they are not only preyed upon by their own Government officials, but also by the Bedawin of the desert, who constantly make inroads from the south country and carry oft the corn as it lies on the threshing-floors. They are probably descendants of the ancient inhabitants of the land, and their traditions go far to prove this. It was on these pasture lands that the royal herds of King David were wont to graze, and their excellence is referred to by the prophet Isaiah (xxxv. i, 2) : " The desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose. It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing : the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency of Carmel and Sharon."