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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 143
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 143. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 143. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/196

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 143, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 143
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_162.jpg
Transcript MARITIME CITIES OF PALESTINE. 143 The journey from Jaffa (see page 137) to Jerusalem (see page 1, vol. i.) may now be made in an omnibus in about twelve hours; two vehicles run daily each way, under the superintendence of the Temple colonists. Telegraphic posts and wires, and watch-houses at intervals of about two miles or less, mark the course of the road (see page 195, vol. i.). Travellers who prefer riding usually start from Jaffa early in the afternoon, and spend the night at Ramleh (see page 148), ready to start for Jerusalem before dawn on the following day ; but there was no choice in the matter when I arrived in Palestine in the year 1855, for there was not a wheeled carriage of any kind in the country, not even a wheel-barrow. I well remember my first ride on the Jaffa road. We had spent a short time in quarantine, and had been afterwards kindly entertained by Dr. Kayat, the British Consul at Jaffa, and his family, in their pleasant bow-windowed house by the seaside, when, towards the close of a July day—our fellow-travellers and the muleteers with the baggage being in readiness—we mounted and set out on our journey. An old man in a coat of many colours led my horse up the steep and narrow streets of stairs, through the crowded bazaars (see pages 129 and 140), and out at the great gate north-east of the town. It was about six o'clock. The open space outside the gate was in shade, for the sun was going down towards the sea, and here picturesque groups of the townspeople, seated on low stools or on matting, were enjoying their pipes, while others, well mounted, were galloping backwards and forwards. We rode towards the southeast, along a broad sandy road, which led us to a bridle-path between dusty hedges of cactus (opimtia), the large fleshy thick-jointed leaves of which were fringed with yellow dowers, promising a rich harvest of prickly pears. In the fruit gardens on each side oranges, lemons, pistachios, apricots, almonds, and mulberries were ripening. The pomegranate tree showed its scarlet flowers, and acacias, locust-trees, tamarisks, olive, and fig-trees flourished, while here and there a group of palm-trees laden with golden fruit towered above them. We paused for a few minutes at a wayside tomb and fountain, " the Sebil of Abu Nabut," who was Governor of Jaffa at the commencement of this century. It is popularly called the Tomb of Tabitha. (Close to this tomb (see page 136), and extending northwards from it into the fruit gardens, the ancient cemetery of Jaffa was discovered, in the year 1874, by M. C. Clermont Ganneau. It contains many rock-cut tombs, and the circle of ground which includes them is known as Ard Dhabitha, "the land of Dhabitha.") It was about half-past six when we reached the open country beyond the gardens. The sun went down. Vultures and kites were sweeping through the air. As the darkness increased our little party, including our servants and six muleteers, assembled together to keep in close company for the rest of the way. We could distinguish parties of field labourers and oxen at rest by the roadside, and sometimes we came to a rude threshing-floor, where by the light of a bonfire of weeds and thorns we saw Rembrandt-like groups of rough-looking peasants, some of them sleeping, others lighting their long pipes with the fragrant embers. The nine-domed sanctuary of Imam 'Aly presently appeared close to the roadside, its whitewashed walls gleaming through the darkness. It is near to the village of Yazur (see map