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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 142
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 142. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/195.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 142. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/195

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 142, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/195.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 142
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_161.jpg
Transcript i42 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. distance to the north-east of it; they have also acquired a settlement nearer to the city, which was founded by an American colony in 1866. A very large piece of ground beyond the Jaffa gardens, on the south-east side, has been granted to the Agricultural Colony of the Universal Israelitish Alliance. The bazaars of Jaffa are well supplied, and generally crowded with picturesque and motley groups of people (see pages 129 and 140). Herr C. Shick, Government Surveyor of Buildings at Jerusalem, says in a recent report: " The town wall has been demolished, the ditch filled up, and a number of large houses and magazines have been erected." He adds: " As a sign of the advance of agriculture, it may be mentioned that the Jaffa gardens have increased in extent fourfold during a quarter of a century." These gardens are the principal attraction of the place. They extend about two miles inland, and nearly three miles from north to south. The surface of the ground is sandy, but there is rich soil beneath, and water is abundant. The gardens are enclosed with stone walls or with formidable hedges of prickly pear {Cactus opuntia). Each garden has its well, lined with masonry, and a raised tank or reservoir, which is filled by means of a sakiyeh. The one shown on page 138 is being worked by two women, probably the wives of the gardener. The string of water-jars revolving round the wheel over the well can be distinguished through the arched opening (see also page 81, and for a fuller description of a sakiyeh, see pages 94 and 95). These well-watered gardens produce a great variety of fruit and vegetables. The grapes are delicious and abundant, though the vines are half buried in the sand. The oranges of Jaffa are unrivalled, and are largely exported. One of the chief resources of the inhabitants is the annual arrival of pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem. There is tolerably good hotel accommodation, and the Latin Monastery offers a welcome to travellers. It stands high on the slope of the hill, and is said to occupy the site of the house of Simon the Tanner, but a little Mohammedan mosque or sanctuary by the seaside claims to be the house itself (Acts x. 6) (see page 132). From the roof of the house there is a good view of the harbour (see page 133). The domestic architecture of Jaffa (see steel plate) resembles that of Jerusalem (see pages 8 and 9, vol. i.); there being very little timber available for building, the roofs are necessarily constructed of stone and are therefore domed. The base of the dome is always more or less concealed by masonry, so that a flat space may be secured for walking upon. These terraced roofs are generally protected by a low wall or parapet, as they must have been anciently in obedience to the law : " When thou buildest a new house, then thou shalt make a battlement for thy roof, that thou bring not blood upon thine house, if any man fall from thence " (Deut. xxii. 8). The parapets and upper portions of walls of houses of this description are frequently constructed partly of earthenware pipes about five inches in diameter and eight or ten inches long. These tubular bricks are embedded in cement and arranged in fanciful geometrical patterns. The house-top represented on page 133 is a good example of this peculiar mode of construction (see also page 40, vol. L). Near to the gate of Jaffa there is a handsome fountain (see page 137).