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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 139
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 139. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 139. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 139, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 139
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_158.jpg
Transcript MARITIME CITIES OF PALESTINE. i39 Saba, and on the same plain with it. It is strewn with tessera?, Roman bricks, and fragments of marble, and close to it are the copious streams which form the chief source of the Nahr el Aujeh (see page 121). Mr. James Finn, in his "Byways in Palestine" (1868), says:—" It is impossible to avoid the conclusion that this is the true site of Antipatris. The mound has still a dry trench round it, which must have anciently had its current of water;" and he adds, " no better spot could have been selected for a military station." To Antipatris St. Paul was hurriedly conveyed by night from Jerusalem by a military guard, and thence conducted to Caesarea (see page 108) on the morrow (Acts xxiii. 31,32). On the Roman road, between Antipatris and Jerusalem, there is an extensive mound of ruins called Tibneh, which Christian tradition identifies with Timnath Sera, the city of Joshua and his burial place (Joshua xxiv. 30). A remarkable tomb in a rock-cut cemetery, on a declivity south of the mound, is associated with this tradition (see page 125). Lieutenant Conder says:— " There are niches for over two hundred lamps in front of the tomb entrance. Within there is a chamber with fourteen graves or kokim, and a passage which leads to an inner chamber with only one koka. . . . The great oak-tree some forty feet high, near the tomb, is called Sheikh et Teim (the chief servant of God)" (see page 124). M. Guerin, who regards this tomb as the veritable tomb of Joshua, states that the peasants opened the inner chamber shortly before his visit to the place in 1863, and they found a sort of candelabrum with three branches, in yellow metal. Flint knives were found in the kokim of this tomb by the Abb6 Richard in 1870. (For the Samaritan tradition respecting the tomb of Joshua, refer to page 234, vol. i.) JAFFA, THE ANCIENT JOPPA. Jaffa, or rather Yafa, is one of the oldes t seaports in the world, and its name has been preserved almost unchanged from the earliest times—JSS Yapho, " the beautiful." To the " haven of Joppa" cedars of Lebanon (see page 475, vol. i.) were sent "in notes" for the building of successive Temples at Jerusalem (2 Chron. ii. 16; 1 Esdras v. 55). Jonathan Maccabaeus besieged Joppa "and won it" (1 Mace. x. 75, 76). The city fell successively under Greek and Roman sway, and had been several times destroyed and rebuilt before the Arab invasion, a.d. 636. It was acquired by the Crusaders in 1099, and after having been lost and regained several times, was finally taken by the Sultan Melek ed Daher Bibars in 1267, who left it in ruins. It was not until the end of the seventeenth century that the place began to revive. It was, however, a walled town when Napoleon's army attacked it in 1799, and it was able to make resistance for a few days, but was finally taken by storm on the 4th of March, and a terrible massacre of prisoners ensued. Napoleon then caused the fortifications to be strengthened, and the place prepared for receiving supplies from Egypt, but after his defeat at Acre (refer to page 75), he gave orders for the fortifications to be entirely destroyed. They were accordingly blown up on May 27th, 1799. The walls were rebuilt under the superintendence of English and Turkish officers. No change has been made in the site of the city: the Jaffa