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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 135
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 135. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/188.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 135. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/188

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 135, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/188.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 135
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_154.jpg
Transcript MARITIME CITIES OF PALESTINE. i35 and after supper and some talk with the sheikh we walked for a little time on the star-lit terrace, where our servants, rolled up in their heavy cloaks and wadded quilts, were already in deep sleep. We rested for a few hours in the great guest-chamber, and when the mueddin (see page 385, vol. i.) chanted the call to prayer from the little minaret close by, " Awake, sleepers, it is better to pray than to sleep," we answered to the call and then went on to the terrace. The day was just beginning to dawn. It was three o'clock, and the loud shrill voice echoing from the courtyard below reminded us that it was the hour of the "first cock- crowing:" the "second cock-crowing" is at sunrise, about two hours later. At four o'clock we were ready to pursue our journey, and we rode away, grateful for the shelter which had been given to us in this ancient sanctuary. At a very short distance from this place, towards the north, are the ruins of the Crusading fortress of Arsuf (see map). It is alluded to by Josephus under the name of Apollonia, but of its early history scarcely anything appears to be known, except that it was in ruins in the year 57 B.C., and subsequently rebuilt by the Romans. Arsuf must have been a strong fortress in the eleventh century, for it is recorded that Godfrey of Bouillon, King of Jerusalem, besieged it unsuccessfully ; but it shared the fate of Caesarea, and was taken by Godfrey's brother and successor, Baldwin I., and, like Caesarea, was recaptured by the Mohammedans. During Richard Coeur de Lion's famous march of a hundred miles from Acre (see p 73) to Ascalon (see page 169), in 1191, for the recovery of the Crusading fortresses on tin- sea coast, it was in the neighbourhood of Arsuf that the most important encounter took place, when Saladin's troops were defeated and the fortress of Arsuf regained. The Arab historian, Boha-ed-din, admits that it was the forest of Arsuf alone that saved Saladin's army from destruction, since without its shelter they would have been pursued and dispersed. Arsuf was refortified by Louis IX. in 1251, but in 1265 this fortress was successfully besieged by the Sultan Melek ed Daher Bibars. The inhabitants were massacred and the place destroyed : it has remained in ruins ever since. Lieutenant Kitchener, R.E., in his "Journal of the Survey" (1877), says: "The Castle of Arsuf is very like Ascalon (see Page I73) m the style of its masonry and the excellence of the cement employed. In places where the stones are weathered away, the cement remains. In other places the pointing remains as fresh as when the masons left it. The castle was built on a bad foundation of very soft rock, on the seaside : this has been worn away, and the walls have slid down bodily. They are naturally cracked and broken, but immense portions of the walls have rolled dou n from a great height without breaking up. In some parts the walls look as if they had been built on sloping scarps, so perfectly have they slid from their high position. A quantity of green sulphate of copper is scattered about, attached to the rocks in crystals." The harbour was well constructed, and "measured three hundred feet from north to south, and one hundred and twenty from east to west," with an entrance barely thirty feet wide.