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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 130
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 130. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 130. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/183

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 130, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 130
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_149.jpg
Transcript mmrtmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmm I jo PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. among fallen columns and huge masses of masonry, where, in succession, palaces and forums Roman temples, s, Byzantine basilicas, mosques, and mediaeval churches hav< The foundation of the cathedral can be traced, and near to the edge of the low cliffs then the remains of a church of the Crusading era, consisting of its three apses and four ma buttresses, which stand erect and firm, though the walls they were intended to support fell long (They are shown in the steel engraving.) 1 once spent an hour or two here quite alone, while my fellow-travellers and our attendants were all wisely sleeping or resting, during the mid-day hours of a midsummer clay, in a shady place by the seashore. I mounted the low cliff and wandered among the ruins. Not a human being was visible, and I shall never forget the impression which the solitude and silence and utter desolation of this place made upon me. are a U-w cisterns, but only one shallow well of brackish water, within the walls; hut the Roman city was evidently well supplied. There are traces of a low-level aqueduct, which brought water from Nahr ez Zerka, and fragments remain of a high-level conduit, which crossed the marshes <>n arches of fine masonry, and conveyed spring water from the main source of the Zerka, in the distant hills. On the sandy shore south of the mole (see page 108) I gathered beautiful pale yellow poppies and prickly sea holly, and found some good specimens of white and yellow-tinted opercular but no perfect shells, though the shore was strewn with broken ones. The Arabs call these ruins Kaisertyeh, thus preserving the name of the city in its Greek form, KcuoipeuL. From Caesarea we pursue our way southwards along the seashore, presently crossing the bed of the Wad)' Mefjir (called by some writers Nahr Akhdar), and hastening onwards to .1 rocky point of land which forms a small harbour, where there is a rude landing place I boats, called the Minet, or port, of Abu Zabura. It is near to the river Iskanderu: (Alexander), to which il gives its more popular name of Nahr Abu Zabura (see map). This r in the summer time has not sufficient force to reach the sea, but forms a shallow lake net far from it. At this point we leave the seashore and ascend the cliff of the broad sandstone ridge on our left. The first village we come to is Mukhalid, standing near to the high road about a mile from the cA^c of the cliffs, midway between the river Iskanderuneh and Nahr el balik (see map). It is the centre of the melon-growing district. I was here once with my brother at the commencement of the melon harvest. We approached this place at about half] n one July morning. A lively picture of Arab life was before us. All along the r between the road and the (^A^o (A~ the cliff, as far as we could see, north and south, there 1 - of various kinds iA' melons, and groups of duskv peasants in white shirts, with leathern girdles and large white turbans, were busily engaged gathering them and building them up in pyramids. Hundreds of camels were there too, some walking away well laden, Ott kneeling patiently while their panniers were being filled with the bulky fruit. White tentt were pitched here and there in the melon gardens: they were the tents of the tax-gatlv who had come to claim the tribute of the melon harvest.