Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 127
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 127. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 127. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/179

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 127, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 127
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_145.jpg
Transcript MARITIME CITIES OF PALESTINE. 12; short space of ten or twelve years, and was inaugurated with great pomp and splendour in the twenty-eighth year of his reign, b.c. 12. There were musical performances, public games, single combats, and combats with wild beasts; horse races also, and " such sports and shows as used to be exhibited at Rome and other places." The multitude of people who came to the city to witness its inauguration were entertained in public inns and at public tables ; and Herod ordered that the festival should be celebrated every five years, in honour of Augustus Caesar, to whom the city was dedicated. " It contained sumptuous palaces and splendid edifices, all built of white stone brought from a distance," now represented by shapeless mounds, fallen columns, and dislocated masses of masonry. There was a theatre of stone, and in the south quarter " an amphitheatre also, capable of holding a vast number of men, and conveniently situated for a prospect of the sea." But the greatest work was the harbour, which had a double station for ships, and which Josephus compares to the Piraeus at Athens. Its mole, the ruins of which still exist, extending a great distance into the sea on the southern side of the harbour (see page 108), was constructed of huge stones, and was originally, according to Josephus, " two hundred feet wide. One half was left as a breakwater, but the other half had upon it a wall with several towers, die largest of which was named Drusus, after a son-in-law of Caesar, who died young." The great blocks of granite and the marble columns lying in the water are no doubt fragments of these structures. There were vaulted hostelries for the sailors and a terraced walk all round the harbour, where stood, on an elevation, a temple of polished stone, which could be seen from a gnat distance, and wherein were two statues, one of Rome and one of Caesar. Of this temple a portion of the foundation wall remains, and Lieutenant Conder says " its white stones contrast with the brown sandstone blocks of the later builders, and attest Josephus's accuracy in describing the materials as brought, at great expense, from a distance." There are a great number of prostrate columns in the sea, upon a reef on the north side of the harbour (see page 109). Caesarea soon became the most important city in Palestine, and its chief port. It was the official residence of the Herodian kings and of the Roman procurators. Repeated mention is made of Caesarea in the Acts of the Apostles, especially in connection with St. Paul, who visited this place several times, and was detained here in prison for two years. At Caesarea, Vespasian was declared Emperor, a.d. 70, and he bestowed upon the city the privileges of a Roman colony. The imperial coinage of Caesarea extends from the reign of Augustus Caesar (from whom the city derived its name) to Gallienus, a.d. 268. At the commencement of the third century Caesarea was created a bishopric, and was soon afterwards famous for its public school, in which for a time Origen taught. Eusebius, the celebrated ecclesiastical historian, was Bishop of Caesarea early in the fourth century, and towards its close the city was visited by Sta. Paula, the friend of Jerome. It is recorded that she saw the house of the centurion Cornelius, which had been converted into a church, and the house of Philip, with the chambers of his four daughters. In the sixth century the Greek historian Procopius was established here as professor of rhetoric.