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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 118
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 118. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 118. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/170

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 118, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 118
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_136.jpg
Transcript u8 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. thirty feel in height, formed of rubble faced with stone. The lower part is crumblin It was the er block of a fortress built here by the Crusaders (see page 105). This place is now quite abandoned, its walls have fallen, and the cliffs are giving way. The modern village of Tanturah is about half a mile farther south, and stands on the site of the ancient I i.ianitish city of Dor (see Joshua xvil 11), but all along the shore there are columns capitals, partly embedded in the ground, slabs of marble, and hewn stones, remains of the Roman city Dora. Women and children maybe seen collecting in large baskets the CO rusted salt, which settles in the natural hollows and artificial basins of tin on the h below. Herds of cattle and goats, the chief wealth of Tanturah, graze on ti plain, which is here overgrown with thorns and thistles, dwarf mimosas, and low brushwood. The village of I anturah consists of about forty or fifty rudely built houses, made of irregularly piled blocks of anciently hewn stone, fragments of broken columns, and masses of mud and clay. < h\ one occasion, in the month of September, when we were on our way from Jafl to Haifa (see page 83) in an Arab sailing boat, we landed at Tanturah to pursue journey by land, because ,l the winds were contrary." It was at the same time of the year (after the Fast of ihe Atonement, which is kept on the tenth day of Tishri,or towards the end September), that St Paul was tossed about by " contrary winds" on this sea, and whei he .u'd, "sailing was dangerous" (Acts xxvii. 9). We were assured that the voyage from Jaffa to Haifa by sea would not occupy more than 1 or ten hours, and as we were extremely anxious to arrive then! as quickly as possible my brother made arrangements with the owner of a little Arab sailing-boat to conve) us there, with our servants and baggage. We were ready and waiting, when at midnight he sent word to us that 'the wind was favourable," and that he was ready to sail. We hurried down to the dark wharf accompanied by our kawass and my servant Katrine, a woman oi Bethlehem, and two Carmelite monks who had requested permission to travel with us. The great water- was opened for US, and I was somehow dropped gently into a little rowin-bo.it far down in the darkness below, where I was taken charge of by two sturdy boatmen. After much shouting ami jolting we were all huddled together, and the boat skimmed rapidly 1 the water to the sailing vessel which awaited us outside the shallow rock-encircled harl and to which with some little difficulty we were transferred. It was divided into three parts the central portion being like an uncovered hold, four feet deep and eight feet square. Ihe deck a\\A aft, wore encumbered with ship's tackle and crowded with sailors, who v singing lustily. Ihe hold, lighted by two lanterns, was matted and set apart for pass<r and lu ( )ur portmanteaus and carpet bags served us for a couch, and the monks sat on their saddle bags, wrapped in their comfortable looking hooded robes. boor Katrine, who had never been on th before, was verj much alarmed She rolled herself up in her cl< stretched herself full length by my side, and was happily soon fast asleep. < hit* kaw >ked pipe in company with the captain above, and an Italian, who had smuggled himself and his OB board in the hurry and darkness, kept aloof with the sailors. The sky Was bflgW