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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 110
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 110. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 110. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/162

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 110, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/162.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 110
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_128.jpg
Transcript , IO PICTLRESQl '/•; l\tLESTINE. which I bore, and die western slopes of Carmel. These ran raduaDy approach I her till they almost meet at Tell es Semak (Sycaminuni) at the foot of the Hand of Carmel (sec map). From this point to Athlit the road, a very ancient one. on which the ruts of chariot wheels maybe 1 here and there, runs just within the ri rock, and the traveller only obtains occasional glimpses of " the through narrow fissures made fertile by winter torrents. The only village in this, the northern section of the plain of Athlit, is Tireh, whose inhabitants are noted for their turbulence ami daring. Its houses of mud and stone are clustered together at the mouth of Wady el Ain (Valley of the Spring), the central valley in the western slopes of Carmel, and are surrounded by cultiw fields and orchards. actly opposite to Athlit Hum Peregrinorum) (see page* ioo), the coast-road turns abruptly and p through a narrow and very ancient defile, cut through the broad rich just wide enough to enable two horsemen to ride abreast freely. There deep broad ruts in the roadway, made b\chariot wheels many centurie Lintels at end of this rock cut passage show that it was protected by \\ and there are the remains of fortifications on thr (lifts above From this rock-cut pa Athlit probably derived its mediaeval name of Petra [ncisa. The old chariot-road from this point runs outside or west of thr sand tone ridge, but there is a narrow coast plain, which varies from half a mile i mile in width, between it and thr seashore The fortre to! Athlit. which was built by the T< inplars in i:iS, on ancient foundations whose history is unknown, stands on a rocky promontory which runs westward into tli< distance of about a quarter of a mile There is a shallow shell strewn harbour on thr south (shown on page loo), and a rather deeper and much wider one on the north side, protl called by the natives "Bum (the Portals). A larg >und adjoining thr promontory was enclosed by a strongly fortified wall, which can still be tra> I from the northern harbour ami tab OUthemly direction for eight hundred). and then runs westward t<> the sea, a distance of three hundred yards. Portions of this wall which was constructed of very large hewn stones, are still standing, but still more of it ma i in the western wall of Akka, which was almost entirely rebuilt of stones carried away from Athlit by Ibrahim Pasha, as related on page 70. Beyond the wall there was which thr sea formerly flowed, thus entirely insulating the fortress, which ma rfbed as a miniature reproduction of the ancient Tyre (see pages 55 and 56), and it is lually called Tyre in ancient chronicles of the Crusades. I he citadel ot A t 111 it occupies a rectangular space in the centre of the promontory. Its walls, fifteen feet in thickness aaA thirty feet in height, are constructed of sandy and rather porous limestone from a neighbouring quarry. Lieutenant C. k. Conder ol 1 that u the all drafted and in situ, whence it has been supposed to be earlier work than the Crusading erections, but the posterns of the towers have pointed ar< ",n drafted masonry, identical with that of the walls, showing that the Crusaders cut their own