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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 107
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 107. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/159.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 107. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/159

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 107, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/159.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 107
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_125.jpg
Transcript ACRE, THE KEY OF PALESTINE. IO; was a rain to this day), and soon the heavens were "black with clouds and wind, and there great rain. And Ahab rode, and went to Jezreel ... and Elijah girded up his loins, and ran before Ahab to the entrance of Jezreel" (i Kings xviii. 45, 46). The view (on page 96) of the great treeless plain of Esdraelon (Merj ibn Amir), as seen from El Mahrakah, shows the route they must have taken. They went towards the south-east, curving round the curiously shaped hill called Tell Kaimiin, which I have heard compared to a curved cucumber (the site of Jokneam), and then hastened onwards straight to Jezreel (Zerin), a distance of sixteen miles. The modern village and its little castle can be plainly distinguished in the illustration, and it is interesting to compare them with the nearer views shown on pages 264, 265, and 268, vol. i. The view from El Mahrakah, looking towards the north-east (see page 93), shows the Kishon under its best aspect, when its waters are abundant after the rainy season, when all the winter torrents of the hills are full and overflowing. The banks are fringed with oleanders, tall lupins, and St. John's wort, and many kinds of rushes, reeds, and grasses (see page 97). The rounded hill just beyond the river, on page 93,. is Tell el Kassis, and farther away, at the edge of the oak forest, there is a village (hidden by the tree in the foreground) called Sheikh Abreik, famous for its subterraneous caverns called Jehennum (Gehenna), which arc well worthy of a visit. Further down the river, at the lower end of the narrow pass which leads from the plain of Esdraelon to the plain of 'Akka, there is a village called El Harothleh. It is on a rounded hill, or rather a large mound, over which are scattered the remains of ancient walls and buildings. It was evidently at one time an important fortress, and is said to mark the site of " Harosheth of the Gentiles" (Judges iv. 16), the stronghold of Sisera, towards which his chariots and his hosts were fleeing when " the Kishon swept them away " (Judges v. 21). Harothieh is rather more than half a mile from the Kishon, which near this point approaches so close to the steep slopes of Carmel that in some places there is not room for more than four or five horsemen to ride abreast with safety. It is conjectured that it was at this gradually narrowing pass at the foot of Carmel, within sight of Harosheth, that the horses and chariots of Sisera's defeated army became inextricably crowded together, and trampled each other down (Judges v. 22). The river on emerging from the narrow valley flows between steep banks of rich loamy soil fifteen or sixteen feet high, and it is fordable only in two places. There is a ford not far from Harothieh. I crossed it once, in October, when there was very little water flowing; but the muddy bed of the river, which at that spot was about twenty feet wide, seemed to me as if it would swallow us up, and I was very glad when my good horse had scrambled up the steep slippery bank on the opposite side and landed me safely on its summit. A serpentine line of verdure marks the course of the Kishon across the plain of 'Akka. There is generally a firm sand-bar at the mouth of the Kishon which can be easily crossed, though the sea washes over it. Sometimes, however, when strong east winds sweep the bar away, a ferry-boat is used. Nahr el Mukutt'a, the modern name of the Kishon, signifies the " river of the ford,"