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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 95
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 95. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/147.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 95. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/147

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 95, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/147.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 95
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_113.jpg
Transcript ACRE, THE KEY OF PALESTINE. 9- kept in motion by a blindfolded mule. As the creaking wheel turned round, the jars dipped into the well and were filled with water, and as soon as they reached the top of the wheel they emptied themselves into the trough, and so on again and again as long as the mule kept up his monotonous round, urged on by a little barefooted boy, stick in hand (see page 81). (This machine is called a sdkiyeh; it is said to be of Persian origin, and is much used in Egypt.) A hole in the lower part of the wall of the reservoir was every day unplugged for a certain time, and the water allowed to flow into the little furrows or channels which intersected the beds of vegetables and encircled the trees (see page 284, vol. i.). The town of Haifa occupies a space in the form of a parallelogram on a gently rising slope close to the seashore, and is protected by well-built stone walls. It has two embattled gates, one at each end of the main thoroughfare, which is parallel with the shore, and has an open space in the middle where camels and their drivers often bivouac by lantern or moonlight. The houses are very irregularly distributed, and with few exceptions have fiat roofs, on which the grass grows freely after the winter rains. Those occupied by consuls, foreign merchants, and the wealthier of the townspeople are large substantial two-storied structures, some of which have central verandahed courts paved with marble. The ground- floor premises are generally used for stabling or stores. The town is rapidly rising in importance, and its markets and bazaars are well supplied. Many houses have recently been erected outside the walls. When I first arrived in Haifa in 1855 there were no suburban dwellings except the huts of the gardeners, and the population was not much more than two thousand; but according to a recent estimate it contains five thousand inhabitants, of whom more than half are Christians of various communities. The remainder are Mohammedans and a considerable number of Jews. Immediately behind the town rises a steep hill, a spur from Mount Carmel, dotted with olive and terebinth trees ami crowned by a small castle called Burj Haifa, in which English cannon balls of 1840 arc embedded (see steel plate " Mount Carmel," and page 83). Although both town and castle have a somewhat venerable appearance they are quite modern, and only date from 1761. The old historic Haifa which was taken by the Crusaders in the year 1100, regained by the troops of Saladin in 1190, and retaken and refortified by Louis IX., was a mile and a half north-west of the present town, and extended nearly as far as Ras Kerum (see page 88). It was called by its Christian conquerors the " Seigneurie de Caiphas," and among its successive rulers were Tancred, afterwards Regent of Antioch, and Rorgius, who had previously been " Lord of Hebron." But the city was lost to the Crusaders, and almost destroyed by the Mohammedans, at the end of the thirteenth century. It still existed, however, in 1761, when Sheikh Dhaher-el-'Amer was ruler of Central Palestine (refer to j page 76); but he found it so dangerously exposed to the incursions of nomadic tribes from I the plains of Athlit (see page 92), that he determined that it should be entirely abandoned Having bombarded the place, he used its stones to build the walls of the new town. He also constructed the serai and the castle (see page 83). The people of Haifa by degrees built