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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 91
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 91. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 91. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/142

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 91, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 91
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_108.jpg
Transcript ACRE, THE KEY OF PALESTINE. 9i life, our resurrection, and by whom we have been delivered and pardoned." Another coin dated as above has within the square of the obverse, " One God, one faith, one baptism," with a small cross in the centre, and on the reverse a declaration of trinity in unity, with the words, " Glory to God from age to age, Amen," in the segments of the circle. Christian rule in Palestine came to an end in a.d. 1291, when the Egyptian sultan, Melek- el-Ashraf Khalil, son of Kalaoun, took the city of 'Akka by storm, after a siege of one month. He gave orders for the demolition of its walls and churches; but a gateway of one of its churches was preserved and carried to Cairo (El Kahireh) as a trophy of victory. El Makrizi, the celebrated Arab historian (refer to page 476, vol. i.) relates the circumstance, and speaks with enthusiasm of the beauty of this gate, saying, " It is one of the most admirable that the hands of man have made, for it is of white marble, novel in style, surpassing in workmanship, its bases and jambs and columns all conjoined (clustered), and the whole wi conveyed to AI Kahireh." It forms the entrance to the mosque tomb of Melek-en-Nasr Mohammed, brother and successor (1293—1341) of the above Melek-el-Ashraf Khalil (1290 —1293), in the Suk en Nahhasin, one of the main thoroughfares of Cairo; and it often puzzles travellers who do not know its history. This gateway is especially interesting, being the only perfect relic now left of the numerous churches built by the Crusaders at 'Akka. A traveller in Palestine in the middle of the fourteenth century (Ludolf de Suchem) describes 'Akka as empty and desolate, but he says that its churches, towers, and palai were not then so completely destroyed as to have rendered their restoration impossible. About sixty Saracens were left to guard the place and port. They supported themselves by the culture of silk and the sale of doves and partridges which swarmed then-. The city \ still in ruins when it passed into the possession of Selim I., the Sultan of Turkey, a.d. 1517, and it did not begin to revive until the seventeenth century. The only remains of Crusading work now distinguishable are the subterranean magazines beneath the modern military hospital, a range of immense vaults under the ramparts, traces of the churches of St. Andrew and of St. John, and portions of the city wall. About one mile due east of'Akka stands the "Mount Turon " of the Crusaders, where Richard Cceur de Lion encamped in 1191, and where, in 1799 Napoleon planted his batteries in vain. It is an isolated and apparently artificial mount, ninety-six feet in height, completely dominating the city of 'Akka and overlooking the plain. The Arabic name of this hill is Tell el Fokhar, " the hill of potter's clay," but it is sometimes called Napoleon's Mount, and is also known as the Mount of Antikdr, the name given to King Richard in the numerous Arabian chronicles of the Crusades. MOUNT CARMEL AND THE RIVER KISHON. The distance, in a straight line, from the promontory of'Akka to the headland of Carmel (Ras Kemm, literally " the head of the vineyard ") is eight miles (see page 88). Between these