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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 79
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 79. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 79. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/130

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 79, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/130.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 79
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_096.jpg
Transcript ACRE, THE KEY OF PALESTINE. 7g trade and commerce. The city was occupied by the elite of the Egyptian army under Colonel Seve (a former aide-de-camp to Marshal Ney), and was kept constantly stored with five years' provisions and abundant ammunition. Ibrahim Pasha caused the long western sea-wall to be almost entirely reconstructed, with stones carried away from the fortress of 'Athlit (see page 98). The scarps of this wall are from thirty to forty feet in height; in its centre stands the Burj el Hadid (the Iron Tower); at the northern end there is another important tower called Burj el Kerim, while Burj Sanjak (the Flag Tower), also built by Ibrahim with stones from 'Athlit, protects the southern extremity. But as soon as the city had to all outward appearance recovered from the terrible effects of the siege of the year 1832, it had to undergo another bombardment. The fleets of England, Austria, and Turkey united to expel the Egyptian invaders from Syria and Palestine, just when the people in the district of 'Akka were becoming somewhat reconciled to the rigorous rule of Ibrahim Pasha. But the siege on this occasion, though most disastrous, was of very short duration. The British fleet appeared off 'Akka on the 3rd of November, 1840, and the Egyptian colours were immediately hoisted at the Citadel and the Flag Tower, in defiance. Admiral Stopford directed the operations of the squadron from a steamboat. Commodore Napier, commanding the northern, and Captain Collier the southern division, led their ships close up to the fortress, and took up their positions at two o'clock in the afternoon, under a tremendous fire from the batteries. But the Egyptian artillery officers had not anticipated that the fleet would venture so near to the ramparts, and they fired very much too high. The result was that while the ships poured in their broadsides in a terrific manner, and with great effect, the balls from the fortress flew over their hulls almost harmlessly. There was an uninterrupted roar of guns and the atmosphere was darkened with smoke. At about four o'clock a terrible explosion took place within the fortifications on the land side. The whole of the arsenal and one of the principal magazines, containing five hundred barrels of powder, were blown up, and two entire regiments (consisting of at least sixteen hundred men), who were formed in position on the ramparts above it, were at once annihilated. An unknown number of women and children and animals perished at the same time. Everything within an area of sixty thousand square yards was destroyed, and masses of solid buildings, blown to a great height in the air, descended in a shower of fragments, greatly damaging the fortifications on the land side. This accident naturally hastened the conclusion of the contest. At sunset the firing ceased from the ships and from the batteries; the fleet then retired into deep water. Soon after midnight a boat put off from the shore conveying to the fleet the startling intelligence that the Egyptian troops were hastily quitting 'Akka. An armed force immediately landed and took possession of the city without opposition, and thus it became once more a Turkish fortress. Daylight disclosed a terrible state of devastation-scarcely a dwelling-house in the city had escaped injury. Ordnance stores, however, of every description, and in extraordinary abundance, were found in excellent order; no fortress at that period could have been better provided with munitions of war; but the destruction of life had