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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 71
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 71. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/122.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 71. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/122

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 71, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/122.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 71
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_088.jpg
Transcript THE PHOENICIAN PLAIN. 71 and fifty feet above the sea, and five hundred and sixty above the stream at its foot, a tongue of rock stands out between two ravines with perpendicular sides, not more than twenty yards wide and two hundred yards long, and cut off from the ridge behind by a deep artificial chasm. Where needful its sides have been coated with masonry, each tier sloping inwards, but the course above projecting three inches, so that scaling was impracticable. On the top are four successive fortresses, each successively defencible, and under each enormous cisterns, securing an independent supply of water. From the masonry of the lower structures it would seem that the fortress was originally Phoenician, that it was afterwards enlarged, and, perhaps, rebuilt by the Syrian Greeks or the Romans, and finally strengthened as we now see it by the Christian knights. It is, indeed, one of the most interesting relics of the long and hardly won, and still more hardly kept, dominion of our Norman ancestors. Yet all that history tells us of it is, that it was built by Hermann, grand master of the Teutonic knights, in a.d. 1229, and captured by Sultan Bibars in a.d. 1291. The knights, however, did little more than restore and strengthen fortifications of far earlier conquerors, as Phoenician, Greek or Maccabsean, and late Roman work, can be successively traced below the mediaeval structures. From Kul'at el Kurn the road to Acre passes through a partially wooded undulating plain for about four hours, till the maritime plain, drained by the classic river Belus (see page 72), now the Nahr Na'man, is reached. The spurs of the Galilean lower hills run far down and form a low barrier between the plain of Acre and the plain of Esdraelon. From these spurs are fed the springs which supplied" the aqueduct on the north. From the south-east the Belus (see page 72) works its way through its marshy bed, the sand almost absorbing it as it nears the shore. The whole of this plain of Acre is studded, especially at the foot of the surrounding hills, with mud-built villages, many of them inheriting ancient names, but none bearing any other signs of antiquity. Thus we find to the south-east of Acre, Kabul, the Cabul of Joshua and Kings, and north of it Amkah, the old Beth-emek; Semiriyeh, anciently Sherivron-meron; Abdeh, or Abdon ; Jefat, the Jotopata of Josephus ; and many others. The fame of the river Belus arises from the Greek tradition, that the invention of glass manufacture was due in the first instance to the accidental discovery on its banks of a vitreous mass produced by a fire of seaweed among the flints and sand, which some sailors had lighted when camping here. There are no traces of glass works to be seen, but we know that the Tyrians were the first manufacturers, and the tradition may very probably be true. From the springs of the Nahr Na'man is an interesting ride up a gentle wooded slope to Shefa 'Amr, one of the principal villages of the district. We know nothing of its biblical name or history. It first came into notice in the time of the Crusades, and was the head-quarters of Saladin when endeavouring to raise the siege of Acre. On the crest of the hill are the ruins of an extensive mediaeval castle, apparently of Saracenic construction. Nothing of interest beyond its massive walls remains. There is a very fine view of Acre, Haifa, and the plain from this castle. Not a mile to the south, on the opposite hill, is another smaller ruined castle, El Burj.