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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 67
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 67. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/118.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 67. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/118

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 67, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/118.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 67
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_084.jpg
Transcript THE PHOENICIAN PLAIN. 67 bottom that it is difficult for a horseman to pass a laden camel without dismounting, and where he may touch the cliffs on either side with his stick. The sides of the enclosing hills gently slope back, timber being absent, but its place taken by dense brushwood, lentisk, myrtle, arbutus, the lovely.storax, and the Judas-tree all in blossom together, with an undergrowth of endless variety of flowers, generally very different from those of Esdraelon and Galilee, and partaking more of the character of the Lebanon flora—especially a number of ferns of northern type. Just at the mouth of the valley is a little plain, and high up in the rocks on the north side of this opening are some very curious sculptures. On the face of the cliff is cut a square recess about thirty-two inches square, and thirty inches deep. It is set in a bevelled frame of five steps, each two inches deep, cut in the rock. On the back wall of the niche is a fine piece of delicate sculpture, rather weathered. There is a group of five figures, the central one seated and two standing on each side, apparently offering gifts. Over the group is engraved the Egyptian symbol of eternity, with the outstretched wings, the disk, serpents, and other emblems. In many of these Phoenician remains we have the Egyptian, in others the Assyrian recalled, but nowhere has yet been found anything resembling the Hittite type. When we reach the head of the Wady ' Ashur, north of the village of Kefra, the summit of the hill affords a magnificent view. Three thousand feet beneath is the strip of the Phoenician plain, with Tyre conspicuous, jutting out from its neck of sand into the sea, fringed by the Mediterranean. Turning round, Hermon (see pages 334 and 375, vol. i.) and the craters of the Lejah stretch from north to south, with the great castle of Shukif distinct, perched on its crag south-west of Hermon. One bit of snow behind it marks the beginning of the Lebanon (see page 337, vol. L), while on the top of an isolated cone immediately to the east frowns the castle of Tibnin, as though still impregnable, and giving the idea of a stupendous fortress, looking all the larger from its isolation. And now, having surveyed the highlands, we will descend by that charming glen again to Ras el 'Ain (see page 60), and after a farewell glance at its dripping cisterns and fairylike festoons of maiden-hair fern, we continue along the shore till we reach the bluff headland of Ras el Abyad, " White Cape," which boldly projects into the sea, the sharp and clearly defined boundary of the Phoenician Plain (see page 65). The chalky headland is often called the Ladder of Tyre, and a true ladder it would be were it not that many of its rungs are wanting, and the path, being worn in the cliff side without the slightest bridge or fence and overhanging the sea two or three hundred feet below, is somewhat trying to novices in Palestine riding. From the crest of the pass is a very impressive view of the Phoenician coast. Desolate as the plain is, it is, at least in early summer, green, and shows well with its girdle of sand curving gracefully as it recedes, and then runs out in the headland of Tyre. Curving again inwards from this point we can follow it beyond the promontory of Surafend, which forms the head of the second bow. The ridge of the limestone hills behind varies in colour, through blending shades of purples, reds, and yellows, closing with the white and glittering brow on which we stand, while behind all tower the snowy ranges of Jebel Sunnin and Jebel esh Sheikh (Hermon), from forty