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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 63
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 63. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 63. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/114

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 63, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/114.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 63
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_080.jpg
Transcript THE PHCENICIAN PLAIN. 63 corn-mill, and the water running through leaks, and over the masonry, is wasted as it works its way uselessly to the sea. These springs are first mentioned in the records of ancient Tyre as having been cut off by Shalmaneser when he withdrew from the siege, which certainly implies their importance at that very early date. In the time of the Crusades the water was used for the irrigation of the whole plain, which was cultivated and full of fruit-trees, and especially of sugar-cane, in strange contrast to its present half-desolate state. But what must this plain and Old Tyre have been in the days of Israel, when, relying upon the impregnable insular fortress and their fleets which ruled the sea, the merchant princes had their villas and palaces all along the plain for many miles, in the open country (for the fortifications never extended to Palzeotyrus), and all the wealth and art of the age was lavished on the furniture, the gardens and the baths of her " whose builders had perfected her beauty " and " set forth her comeliness." Ebony and ivory, the gems of India and the riches of the East, bright iron from Cornwall, the gold of Tarshish, the spices of Arabia, the fine linen and broidered work of Egypt, silver and lead, tin and iron from afar, coral and agate from Syria, rich fabrics from Mesopotamia, such were some of the treasures and the decorations of the mother of commerce. But now she " is broken by the seas in the depth of the waters, and her merchandise and all her company in the midst of her are fallen." Yet it would be difficult to find a more lovely moonlight walk than along this beach from Ras el 'Ain to Tyre, with the light beaming far on the water, where now no gallant galley with oars can be seen, but the ghost-like black columns, gaunt in the moonlight, look like spectres on the sea, mourning the fate of their proud city. The ride to Hiram's Tomb (see page 57) may be accomplished from Ras el 'Ain as easily as from Tyre, following the line of the aqueduct (see page 60) for two miles and then turning towards the hills, which here rise very gradually from the plain. Very near Hiram's Tomb, to the southward, is the little village of Hanawieh, surrounded by orchards and olive yards, with many tombs in the sides of the hills. In these tombs have recently been discovered many interesting specimens of Phoenician or at least pre-Roman glass. In a sepulchre, which this year was opened by a charcoal-burner in digging up an old tree root, a complete set of funereal glass was found, undisturbed as when first placed in the newly-occupied tomb, which was a very small niche just large enough for a body and about four feet high, hewn at the foot of a rock against which earth and rubbish had accumulated. At each of the four corners of the tomb was a lachrymatory, much larger than the ordinary or later Roman ones and with a very long neck. At the upper part of the tomb were placed two flat dishes, one about six inches, the other twelve inches in diameter, for the meat and bread offerings for the dead, and a glass flask of antique and graceful shape for the wine. The tombs in all these hills may be counted by thousands, but they have been rifled and rifled again centuries ago; many of them afford evidence of successive occupation by the dead of epochs distant from each other. For instance, to many of the old Phoenician tombs, which may be recognised at once by the style of their sculpture, there have been added Roman or Greek facades in various different styles, and niches for statues, subsequent to the original