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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 58
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 58. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/109.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 58. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/109

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 58, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/109.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 58
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_075.jpg
Transcript 5s PICTi RESQl 7: 1\ tLEST/NE. What does not Europe owe in the way of civilisation to these d village > W( j denunciations of Kxekiel to see h t and h <+A trade. I invent: id the cradle of -lass manufactory, and for I her pre-eminence. It was from Tyre that some adventurous moo] pi] i the i Northumbria, brought into England the the manufacture, the bai Wear the first -lass works of the West in tl ^ heptarchy Hence can brilliant dyes which made resplendent th< • king* hence the bronze and metal which equipped the armies of antiquity. The tin) of PhtJL-nicia penetrated into unknown a\u\ brought back to the the news - rid I the Pillars of I ler< Tyre worked the min( >pain, and freighted her ships with the tin of Cornwall From this little rock sprang the men who dotted t! tern shores of the Me literranean with their colonies. She was the mother of that Carthage which 1Cr mistress of the and all but wrested the empire of the world from her rival. ! ill, to Phoenicia we owe our alphabet Hence Cadmus borrowed th which have enshrined the of Homer, and have become the framework for the expressi : Europe. When this marvellous cit) e know not, for its indigenous literature has peris! have | riptions and a few dial ins to tell us what was its Ian I at the time oi the Exodus, 1450 b.< », it w u\ | [oshua \i\. 29), and in th< ol I > avid it Was tamous, not only for its maritime prowess, but for its arts and skill ; its s< brought him cedars from Lebanon, its masons ^n^\ carpenters built his pala« - Still <vas ie between Hiram ,md .Solomon, who formed a treat) of alliance and commerce. ty, which supplied t' ct, the workmen, and many of the materials the I emple. Hut iA the I that day we can trace nothing, unless it be the mas^ sul the harbour. \ <t throughout the Ion- period ^>t Persian supremacy, ryn sod her aped all molestation. Careful to maintain their t: the men «•! I always m licious alliances, and having no ambition for territor) on shore, * allies rather thai :1s, and though Sidon was conquered by Ochus, Tyi lined until capture l>\ Alexander after a n months' sie The number. which ihe sho 1 form the bed iA the sea, all belong to t ond Tyre, which soon rose m its I continued to flourish till destroyed at the enA of tl. :ul centun Pes ennuis Niger. Again ii and maintained its prosperity till the time of the I le* It was long held by the Christians, and in its cathedral Was celebrated one iA' the last r< nal embarkation iA the last remnant of the chivalry <»f I to its prosperity wa n by the conqi ria b) the I Ottomans, in 15K not run on into a histoi We ha\ e been led to muse on the wonder how she ha utterly mined, and where her ruins are. Perhaps they 1- 1 quarr) for the whole \n^\ her stones may now be for the most part in It It has been the which have been continuously inhabited I lar