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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Page 50
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 50. 1883. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1883). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 50. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/101

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2 - Page 50, 1883, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/543/show/101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 2
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1883
Description Index: Phoenicia and Lebanon / by the Rev. H. W. Jessup -- The Phoenician plain / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Acre, the key of Palestine, Mount Carmel and the river Kishon, Maritime cities and plains of Palestine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Lydda and Ramleh, Philistia / By Lt. Col. Warren -- The south country of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The southern borderland and Dead Sea / by Professor Palmer -- Mount Hor and the cliffs of Edom, The convent of St. Catherine / by Miss M. E. Rogers -- Sinai / by the Rev. C. P. Clarke -- The land of Goshen, Cairo, Memphis, Thebes, Edfu and Philae / by S. Lane-Poole.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v.2
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_015
Item Description
Title Page 50
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_015_067.jpg
Transcript 5o PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. buildings to Beirut. There is, however, a little wely called El Khidr, the Arabic name for St. George, who is reverenced as a Muslim as well as a Christian saint; and the wely is reasonably believed to be the successor of the Christian chapel which the Crusaders built over the traditional site of the house of Elijah's hostess. A double interest attaches to this spot, from the tradition (for which we must confess there is no absolute historical ground, but surely much probability) that Sarepta was also blessed by the presence of a greater than Elijah, and that here our Lord showed mercy on the daughter of the Syrophcenician woman. We know that the village He visited was somewhere in the coasts of Tyre and Sidon. The context seems to imply it was beyond Tyre, and this is almost the only village which would meet these requirements. What more natural than that He should visit the place where His great forerunner sojourned so long ? The modern inhabitants of Surafend have moved the sacred localities to their new home, and point out in the present village the house of the widow and the spot where our Lord met the Syrophcenician widow. But nothing is more certain than that until after the times of the Crusades the place was close to the shore. Along the lonely strand skirting the fertile but scarcely cultivated plain we proceed towards Tyre. Strange that such desolation should have overtaken one of the chief cradles of early civilisation! Now lawlessness and barbarism have driven Phoenicia back into the rocky hills, and the weary peasant, with his tools on his shoulder, spends half his time in journeying from security to his field, and in toiling back at sunset to his rocky home. The route to Tyre continues near the shore. Not a village is to be seen:—here and there ancient tombs and a few piles of stones. Several little streams have to be forded, till at length we reach the banks of the Kasimiyeh, the ancient Leontes, still known higher up as the Litany, when we turn inland by the traces of a Roman road towards one of the few bridges which remain unbroken in the country. Here the plain and the valley of the river (see page 53) are well cultivated. There is a khan, not in ruins, for the convenience of travellers, and several villages on either side of the river's course, one just to the south of the bridge. The stream is far too deep and rapid to be forded, and hence the bridge has been of necessity rebuilt (see page 52), a rare, perhaps unique exception to the ordinary system of the country. Hence we might in a short hour ride to the historic capital of Phoenicia. But a day is well spent in an expedition up the tortuous course of the Leontes. For several miles inland the river winds through a rich corn plain of some extent, into which it suddenly emerges from a deep fissure in the long range of the wall of Galilee. The plain is for the most part treeless, though the banks of the stream are richly fringed with oleanders. The country is best understood by riding through the corn-fields on the north bank. Under the foot of the hills is a charming piece of olive ground, with grateful shade, and a village behind it, nestled at the foot of the cliff. It is more than half an hour's very rough scrambling for the horses to reach the crest, when we find ourselves, not on the top of the hill, but on the brow of an upland down studded with villages, and with a noble view seawards, which well repays the climb. The villages are generally three or four miles apart and have names evidently derived from the Hebrew, as Rezieh, Zerayiyeh,