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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 476
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 476. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2686.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 476. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2686

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 476, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2686.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 476
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_497.jpg
Transcript 476 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Temple, with the platform of colossal stones, as the work of Solomon. In 1174 Saleh ed Din, commonly called Saladin, captured Damascus, Hums, Hamath, and Ba'albek. In 1260 the general of Mogul Khan destroyed the fortress. Early in the fourteenth century Abulfeda, the Hamathite, describes Ba'albek as an ancient city enclosed by a wall, with a large and strong fortress. At this time one of the quarters of the city was called El Makriz, and here was born the celebrated historian Taki ed din Ahmed, better known by his more usual name El Makrizi. In 1400 Tamerlane, the Tartar conqueror, captured Ba'albek when on his way to Damascus. The great work of Wood and Dawkins on Ba'albek represents nine columns of the Great Temple standing a.d. i 751. Three of these were destroyed by earthquake in a.d. 1759. The Harfush Emirs and their retainers ruled this region for many years, paying a nominal tribute to the Turks, and grinding the peasantry with merciless extortion. In i860—the massacre summer—they burned the houses of the Christians in Ba'albek and the adjacent villages, murdered many of the people, and plundered their property. Being themselves Metawileh, or Muslims of the Shia, followers of Ali, they forgot their hatred of the orthodox Sunni Mohammedans, and joined them in the massacre of the infidels. But Beit Harfush were always hostile to the Turks, and soon after i860 were outlawed by the government. The Emir Soleiman and his men fled to the mountains, and for years eluded the pursuit of the irregular cavalry. In 1866 Soleiman was finally captured in a cave near Hums by Hulu Pasha, and brought into that city with a list of his crimes written on a placard fastened to his breast. He was led to Damascus, and there exhibited for a few days with the card on his breast, and then poisoned. His name will never be forgotten by the people of Ba'albek and the Buka'a. To-day, the ruthless destruction of the fallen columns and cornices goes on unchecked. The modern town, with the waggon road of the Wali of Damascus, are using up all the movable fragments of the ancient temples. The papal Greek bishop Basileus is now engaged in building a cathedral at the foot of the slope, south of the Hotel Arbid. He has bought the site of a small temple on the summit of the southern hill, and is rolling down the fluted columns and cubical blocks of the temple walls to be used in the modern edifice. Various partial attempts have been made to excavate both within and without the ancient ruins. The colossal headless statue now standing at the gate of the Turkish Serai is an example of what may be expected when a thorough exploration of the ruins shall be made. A few more earthquakes, and a few more winter frosts and gales, will lay the six lordly columns prostrate in the dust. Happy the traveller whose lot it shall be to see Ba'albek, even in its present declining glory, before the relentless forces of nature, and the not less relentless hand of man, shall have completed the work of destruction.