Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 470
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 470. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2680.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 470. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2680

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 470, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2680.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 470
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_491.jpg
Transcript 47° PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. is Baalath of the tribe of Dan. Baalgad also, thought by many to be Ba'albek, is supposed to be Banias (see page 348), so that we cannot be sure that Solomon had any hand in the erection of these seemingly superhuman structures. Yet an Arab would as soon doubt that Noah built the ark as that Solomon built Ba'albek. The voice of Syrian tradition, among all sects and in every district, is that Solomon built the cyclopean walls of Ba'albek, assisted by the genii who were under his control. Dr. Robinson, whose learned chapter on the history of Ba'albek leaves nothing to be desired, states that " the name Heliopolis, ' City of the Sun,' implies that this city, like its namesake in Egypt, was already consecrated to the worship of the sun. Indeed, the sun was one of the chief divinities in the Syrian and Asiatic worship, and to him was applied in their mythology, as well as to Jupiter and some other gods, the name of Baal, or ■ Lord.' The mythology of Egypt had a strong influence upon that of Syria, and it would not be unnatural to suppose a connection between the forms of sun-worship in the two countries. Indeed, this is expressly affirmed ; and Macrobius, in the fifth century, narrates that the image worshipped at Heliopolis in Syria was brought from Heliopolis in Egypt." The whole country in ancient times was given up to Baal-worship. In Hermon and Lebanon, " on every high hill," were groves, domes, and temples sacred to the god of the sun. Baal means lord ; in the Arabic Bible it is the word in common use for husband : " A bishop must be the baal of one wife." The name was in old times attached to places innumerable, and Ba'albek was no doubt the centre of the Syrian Baal-worship. The rising sun was waited for by the priests in Ba'albek, who watched the summits of Jebel Sunnin and Dahr el Kodib (see page 475), above the cedars, for the first golden rays, and, as they flashed across the plain, the grand daily ceremonies of this grandest temple of ancient or modern times were begun. Strabo, Pliny, Josephus, and Ptolemy mention Ba'albek under its Greek name, Heliopolis, but the only name known to the modern Syrians is the more tenacious and more ancient Semitic name, Ba'albek. According to the learned work of Mr. Hogg on Ba'albek, the Great Temple was dedicated " Magriis Diis Helinpoleos," " to the Great Gods of Ba'albek," that is, to the whole pantheon of the divinities worshipped here, the greatest of whom was Baal. The niches around the quadrangle and the hexagon, as well as in the two temples, may have been filled with the statues of the whole family of heathen gods. In the second and third centuries our information with regard to Baalbek is derived chiefly from coins, of which the number is very great From these we learn that Ba'albek was a Roman colony, and enjoyed the boon of the jus Italicum, only granted to favoured provincial cities. On coins of Nerva (a.d. 96) and Adrian, and on many coins of the later emperors, may be seen the device of a colonist driving two oxen, with legends relating to Heliopolis; such as 11 col. jvl. avg. fel." There is reason to believe that a colony of military veterans was sent here by Julius Caesar or Augustus. It is on a coin of Septimus Severus that a temple is first seen with the legend, " Colonia Heliopolis Jovi Optimo Maximo Heliopolitano." On some of the coins are pictures of the two temples, with gables complete, indicating that both temples were finished and roofed. Had they been roofless and simply hypaethral, it is not unlikely