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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 467
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 467. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2677.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 467. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2677

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 467, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2677.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 467
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_488.jpg
Transcript BAALBEK. 467 , wjt]1 advantage. On the north side of the modern village is a ruined mosque (see page 6-) which contains a large number of beautiful columns of syenite and porphyry, taken from the courts of the temple, reminding one of the vast collection of ancient columns of various styles of architecture now standing in the Mosque El 'Aksa, in Jerusalem. There are ten columns of red syenite polished, and eighteen of the native limestone, all with limestone capitals. The ancient walls of the city of Ba'albek were some two miles in extent, but hardly a trace of them now remains, excepting on the south-west side, where its shattered towers and battlements stand out on the hillside in bold relief against the sky. And near the hotel of Arbid you pass through the ruins of the wall, on entering Ba'albek from the west. About one half-hour's ride south-west from the ruins is the very picturesque ruin called Kubbet Duris, or Dome of Duris, consisting of eight polished columns of Egyptian granite, supporting a clumsy structure of limestone blocks (see page 452). The columns were evidently brought from the temples, and one of them is upside down. It was no doubt the tomb or chapel of some Muslim saint, as a sarcophagus stands on end for the mihrab, to show the direction of Mecca. Near one of the mills on the south-east side of the Lesser Temple a beautiful shell-topped canopy from the ruins has been set up as a mihrab, and the well-polished flat stones a few yards - distant show that the faithful have prayed here for many years. We now return to take a farewell look at the Acropolis and a last ride around the gigantic walls. We may spend hours in walking slowly around the cyclopean structure, no part of which is more impressive than the north-west corner, where the colossal stones of the substructures ever fill one with awe, and the great stones along the moat on the north side are a marvel of the cyclopean work of the builders. One of the best views in or around Ba'albek is in the month of April, from the great quadrangle, as you look through the ruins towards the west, with the six columns as a foreground, the green plain of the Buka'a and Sahel Belad Ba'albek beyond, and the snow-crowned summits of the Lebanon in the distance. The deep blue sky, the indescribable transparency of the air, and the brilliant orange tint of the ruins in the morning sunlight, combined with the gleaming of the distant snow, form a picture kept among the choicest treasures of memory, and preserved hi the portfolio of many an artist and amateur. There is, however, another spot which, for a morning view, is unsurpassed. In the extreme north-west corner of the enclosure of the six columns (see page 468) is a low opening through the wall. Creeping through, you come out upon the square tower of the north-west corner into what was once a corner room or chapel, the plaster lining of the wall still being visible. Below you are the colossal stones of the northern Phoenician wall, where the " Hajr Hubla ' (see page 473) was designed to lie, and before you a view of Sahel Ba'albek and •orthern Lebanon which can never be forgotten. From this shady retreat I lately had a 8 of the sun rising on Lebanon, which I would recommend to all visitors to this city of sun-worship.