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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 466
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 466. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2676.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 466. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2676

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 466, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2676.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 466
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_487.jpg
Transcript 466 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. which only the pedestals remain. The columns were four feet three inches in diameter. On two of the pedestals are Latin inscriptions, which in the time of Wood and Dawkins were distinct, but are now almost obliterated. They are nearly identical, beginning, " Magnis Diis Heliopolitanis, pro salute Antonini Pii Felicis Augusti et Juliae Augustae matris domini nostri castrorum," and are votive niemorials in behalf of Antoninus Caracalla (son of Severus), and of the Empress Julia Domna. The north and south wings, or pavilions of this porch, are constructed of cyclopean stones, which, in any other ruin than Ba'albek, would be regarded as wonderful, but here they are but a minor feature in a structure which is throughout overwhelmingly great and impressive (see page 461). There are stones twenty-four feet five inches long. In front, near the bottom of each pavilion, is a door leading to the vaults beneath in the substructions. The top of each has been rebuilt by the Saracens, and their military constructions have well-nigh effaced the form and outline of the. portico. The wings are ornamented with niches, cornices, and pilasters. If all the niches and brackets in these ruins were once occupied by statues, there must be untold treasures of ancient sculpture still buried beneath the debris. Having now completed the circuit of the Acropolis, with its great temples, courts, and portico, there still remain the Temple of Venus, or Nymphasum (El Barbara), the Mosque Ras el 'Ain, and Kubbet Duris (see page 452). The Temple of Venus, or Circular Temple (see page 472), stands about one hundred and fifty yards from the south-east angle of the Temple of the Sun. It is a beautiful little Corinthian structure, circular within and without, with handsome niches at regular intervals each flanked by two columns, so as to give the building the appearance of an octagon. Wreaths hang gracefully from the cornice over each niche. The cella is thirty-eight feet in diameter. The number of columns is six, each nine feet distant from the wall. The entablature supported by these . projecting columns does not run continuously from column to column, but recedes in a graceful curve almost to the wall of the cella, giving the whole an appearance of lightness and elegance rarely equalled. It is looked upon as the gem of Ba'albek. In the days of Maundrell it was used as a Greek Church, although seriously shattered by earthquakes, and he remarks, "It were well if the danger of its falling, which perpetually threatens, would excite those people to use a little more fervour in their prayers than they generally do." Little did Maundrell think that in 1880 the temple would still be standing. The Greeks no longer worship in it, but it is still beautiful, even in decay. It is now called " El Barbara," in honour of St. Barbara. It is under the special - watch and ward of an old Metwaleh woman, Um Kasim, who demands bakshish on the ground that she keeps watch over it, and lights olive oil lamps for those who wish to make vows to the patron saint. The fertility of the soil, the proximity of the water of Ras el 'Ain, and that instinct of self- preservation which drives the Syrians everywhere to crowd their houses and gardens together for mutual protection, have combined to choke up every available space around these ruins with houses, trees, and gardens, so that it is becoming yearly more and more difficult to examine