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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 463
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 463. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 463. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2673

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 463, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 463
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_484.jpg
Transcript BAALBEK. 463 1 peristyle, we pass through the semicircular wall, which is the principal relic of the magnificent basilica of Constantine. Turning north, we pass along about one hundred feet ithout finding traces of exedrae. In the north-west corner there is first a large chamber vith a door, then a rectangular recess with four columns in front, a part of whose cornice is still unfinished, then a semicircular exedrae, with a magnificent groined roof supported bv two columns. These alcoves, as well as the successive semicircular and rectangular exedrx on the north, east, and south sides, are lavishly decorated with shell-topped niches, canopies, rosettes, and arabesques of the most elaborate and minute character. Here were statues innumerable, which doubtless now lie buried under the masses of debris which fill the area. The entablature ran uninterrupted all around the court, the frieze having rich ornaments of pomegranates, grapes, vine-leaves and flowers. In one is a head surrounded with a fan-like canopy of scaly wings; in another a winged dragon. All are decorated within and without with pilasters. There are eight chambers with doors, eight rectangular alcoves with columns, four semicircular dome-roofed exedrae, two niches eighteen feet wide for colossal statues, one on each side of the triple gateway leading into the hexagon, and in the southern niche, among the huge fallen arch stones which formed the ceiling, is a curious circular keystone, as perfect and sharply cut as when fresh from the hand of the builder. The forty-four columns which supported the roofs of these alcoves were of Syenite granite, twenty-nine inches in diameter. As Wood found only the shafts of Syenite, he inferred that the bases and capitals of these columns were of the native limestone, the same rock with the rest of the temple—a very probable supposition. Amid this maze of architectural wonders and unsolved questions, we will not attempt to offer any other solution of the mode of transporting these columns than to suppose them floated from Egypt to Seleucia on rafts, then up the river Orontes as far as practicable, and thence on sledges to the temples of Ba'albek and Palmyra. On the east of the quadrangle is a triple gateway, the broad portal, now in ruins, being fifty feet wide, with two side portals of ten feet, leading into the hexagonal court. This hexagon is two hundred feet in breadth, east and west, and two hundred and fifty from north to south. On the east and around the north and south anodes were rectangular exedrae or alcoves, with smaller rooms intervening. The roofs of the alcoves were supported by twenty columns, all now fallen. The effect of this hexagonal court to one entering from the eastern portico must have been impressive, with its fine proportions and the glimpses of the great peristyle beyond. \\ lthin this hexagon are immense mounds of earth, piled against the north and south walls. May not this mass of earth have been brought in by the Saracens to aid them in rolling up the uge blocks to the top of the fortress walls, and then left as slopes for their soldiers to mount °n to the loopholes above ? We wonder at the cyclopean work of the Phoenicians, but one cannot help admiring the prodigious energy of the Saracens, who lifted these huge blocks from °ne place to another as if they had been mere toys.