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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 462
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 462. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 462. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2672

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 462, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 462
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_483.jpg
Transcript 462 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. feet, the height of the entablature, ascertained by measuring the fragments on the ground, and the wall of forty feet below, and we have a total height of one hundred and twenty-five feet above the plain. What adds greatly to the beauty of the six columns now standing is the orange-coloured weather rust, which gives them a golden glow in almost every light, whether morning, noon, or sunset, and a mellow tint even by moonlight. One cannot look upon them without a feeling of indignation at the vandalism of the Arabs or Turks, who have dug them away at the bottom to secure the paltry value of the iron dowels which hold them in place. (See page 468, and for a distant view of the columns, see page 473.) The base of the third pillar from the east is undermined to a depth of three feet on the northern side. The western column overhangs the base on the north-west side some thirteen inches, and the upper section of the eastern column is so crumbled that it would seem only a matter of months that its noble capital and entablature will come plunging to the earth. The three stones of which each is composed were jointed with mathematical precision, so that at a short distance, even after the attrition of centuries, the joints are almost invisible. The carving of the capitals on the northern face is almost completely gone, while on the south side it is perfect. The reason is, the bitter freezing winds which blow from the north during the winter months are gradually disintegrating the stone. You are never wTeary of looking at the columns. At any distance, from any side, and in any light, they are the same majestic awe-inspiring objects, and you envy the artist traveller who can transfer to canvas their inimitable proportions and exquisite colouring. In the time of Wood and Dawkins, in 1751, nine of these columns were standing. It is impossible to decide whether this matchless peristyle once enclosed a cella with arched peristyles and sculptured soffits, as in the Temple of the Sun (see page 455). An eave trough ran along the whole length of the cornice on the top, and over every column was an eave spout of stone, some of which in both temples are still perfect. Whether roofed or open, whether vaulted or hypaethral, it must have been the glory of its age, and the finest specimen of Corinthian architecture ever built. How were these ponderous cornice blocks, each weighing nearly one hundred tons, raised to this great height ? Expensive and clumsy as modern science might regard it, we see no other practicable hypothesis than that which we have offered for the removal of the four cyclopean stones, namely, on rollers moving on inclined planes or embankments of earth from the quarries to the very summit of the columns. Moving eastward, we now leave the six columns (see page 468) and enter the vast quadrangular area known as the Great Court, our course being that of the ancient devotees on passing out of the great temple. In front we see in the distance the triple gateway with the hexagonal court, and in a direct line another triple portal leading to the great portico. We pause in the great quadrangle. Here, around the sides, are gems of ancient sculpture enough to detain the artist for weeks. This court is four hundred and fifty feet from north to south, and about four hundred from east to west. Beginning on the western side nearest