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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 459
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 459. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2669.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 459. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2669

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 459, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2669.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 459
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_480.jpg
Transcript BAALBEK. 459 elief represent both as having perfect gables and, as far as appearances are concerned, feet roofs. The collection of M. Charlier, in Beirut, contains coins of Ba'albek which plainly 11 trate this fact. The nave of the cella has six fluted attached columns on each side, between hich are two rows of niches, the lower row with a circular scalloped top and a bracket beneath, and the upper with triangular pediments, or tabernacles, forming canopies for the statues. The carving of the canopies is strikingly distinct and bold, as though executed yesterday, the rosettes and arabesques standing out, almost separated from the stone. The sanctum, or holy place for the altar, was about five feet above the main floor of the cella, and thirteen steps led up to it. At each end of the steps a door led down to the vaults, from which the priests uttered their mysterious oracular responses. The screen between the nave and the adytum was supported by fluted columns on each side, and on the walls are undulating figures in high relief, representing a sacrificial procession. Maundrell, in 1697, says that on that part of the partition which remained in his day are " carvings in relievo, representing Neptune, Triton, fishes, sea-gods, Arion and his dolphin, and other marine figures." A more exquisitely beautiful view than that from the east of the portal looking in upon this lavish treasure-house of sculpture cannot be found in the East or the West (see page 464). On each side of the portal within are pillars, in both of which is a spiral staircase leading to the top. The flaking off of the face of the pillar on the south side distinctly shows the structure of this staircase. The exterior of the facade of the temple is in all stages of decay. The rude hand of barbarians, searching for the iron dowels or metal cores between the joints of the columns, has dug away the base of most of the standing columns to the very centre. Four columns are standing on the south-east side, three on the west, and nine on the north side (see page 455). Each column is composed of three pieces, jointed so perfectly that a sheet of paper could not be inserted between the edges. Such perfect jointing, and the perfect preservation of the edges, would indicate that the three blocks must have been placed in position when rough, and then rounded and polished while standing. The sculpture of the capitals and entablatures was probably also executed after the blocks were in place ; in proof ot which the cornice of the rectangular exaedrum in the north-west corner of the quadrangle is partly sculptured, and partly left plain and unfinished. One of the columns on the south side fell about one hundred years ago against the wall of the cella, where it still stands in a leaning position, and although it broke in one of the stones in the cella wall, it is so well put ogether that it remains unbroken to this day (see page 460). The pedestals, still in place 1 the south side, fill one with wonder. But the crowning feature in the ruins of Baalbek ne six columns. The first rays of sunrise fall upon the aerial entablature, seemingly hung 11 mid air, and the last rays of sunset gild it with indescribable glory. The first thought is of wonder that they have stood so long. They stand on a wall fifty feet in height, which rmed the southern wall of the great temple or peristyle (see page 468 and 473).