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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 458
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 458. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2668.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 458. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2668

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 458, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2668.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 458
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_479.jpg
Transcript 45§ PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. interlacing compartments, a most intricate and beautiful design. Some of the slabs are sixteen feet square, and are nearly five feet in thickness. This temple, known to the Arabs as Dar es Sa'adeh, or " Court of Happiness," and generally known as the Temple of the Sun, was two hundred and twenty-five feet in length, including the colonnades, and its breadth about one hundred and twenty (see page 455). The cella, or temple proper, was one hundred and sixty feet long by eighty-five feet broad, surrounded by the magnificent peristyle of fifteen columns on each side and eight at each end, counting the corner columns both ways. At the eastern end was an inside row of six fluted Corinthian columns, and an additional column on each side opposite the north and south walls of the cella, which are extended to form the vestibule. Four columns only remain perfect of this magnificent portico, those of the south-east angle (see page 469). The frieze and cornice above these four columns are most beautiful. A battlemented tower was built over them by the Muslims, who also barbarously raised a huge wall directly in front of the great gate of the temple; but this wall was demolished by Mr. Barker, C.E., in July, 1870, by order of the late Rashid Pasha, who was then Governor-General of Syria. Climbing over heaps of ruins, we find ourselves in an open space east of the temple, and turning westward we behold that architectural gem, the celebrated portal of the temple (see page 464). Every ornament that could be introduced into Corinthian architecture is lavished on this portal, and yet it is perfectly light and graceful. It is twenty-one feet in width and forty-two feet high. It is composed of nine great stones, six forming the jambs and three the lintel. Each of these stones is of enormous dimensions. When I visited Ba'albek, in 1856, the central block or keystone of the lintel, weighing some sixty tons, had slipped down about two feet. When Pococke and Wood sketched the ruins this portal was in a perfect state, but in the earthquake of 1759 a.d. it sunk down between the two others. It is now supported by a pillar of rough masonry which entirely covers the body of the eagle carved on the soffit. He holds a caduceus, or Mercury's wand, in his talons, and in his beak the strings of long garlands extending each way, and having the ends supported by flying genii. This eagle is crested, and hence is not the Roman eagle, but is supposed to be the Oriental eagle consecrated to the sun. The ornamentation around the portal is the most elaborate known in all the range of Corinthian architecture. Not only the architrave but the frieze and the cornice are profusely decorated. There are ears of corn, grapes, and vine leaves, while genii lurk among the leaves in the lower compartments, formed by the intertwining vine, though all are sadly marred by barbarian hands. The surviving scroll on the right is a gem in itself The interior of the cella is divided into two parts, the nave measuring ninety-eight feet by sixty-seven, and the sanctum, or adytum, occupying thirty-six feet of the west end. It has no windows or apertures for light. High authorities have doubted whether it ever had a roof, but the immense mass of debris in the interior would indicate that the roof had fallen in, and there are mortices nearly a foot square over the pilasters, which would imply the existence of beams across the cella at some time in the past. Moreover, the coins on which both this temple and the temple of Jupiter are figured