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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 456
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 456. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2666.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 456. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2666

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 456, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2666.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 456
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_477.jpg
Transcript 456 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. On entering the town I observed a great change since my first visit in 1856. After the massacres of i860 the Christian population began to increase in Ba'albek. New houses were erected, and a carriage road has since been built to Mo'allakah and Shtura, hotels have been erected, Protestant schools established, mulberry orchards planted, vineyards renewed, neglected land ploughed and sown, and a new life seems springing up around this wonderful ruin of ancient civilisation and ancient idolatry. In 1880 the population was estimated at five thousand. Reliable local authorities inform me that Ba'albek contains twelve hundred taxable men. After passing through the ruins of the old wall, and riding through the street nearest the ruins, we passed by the Temple of the Sun (see page 455), and the Circular Temple, or Temple of Venus (see page 472), and then turning westward through the green mulberry garden we found ourselves at the east end of the vast enclosure, and at the foot of the lofty wall which now hides the ancient portico. The great mass of undressed stones in the lower part of the wall indicates that here was the immense flight of steps leading up into the portico. Not one of these steps remains, and no sign of the staircase but two arches, and even these may be Saracenic in origin. A coin of Philip the Arabian shows the staircase complete. The great wall is crowned by a Saracenic battlement with loopholes. The masonry is a patchwork of broken columns, capitals, friezes, and blocks of stone mingled together, but the ancient ashlar below remains uninjured. The plain on which the ruins stand is level, forming the outlet of the fine stream which runs down to the Sahlet Ba'albek from the fountain Ras el 'Ain, half a mile distant to the south-east in a valley of Anti-Lebanon. The ruins stand on a platform of titanic masonry evidently of Phoenician origin, about one thousand feet in length, six hundred feet broad, and varying in height from fifteen to thirty feet. This prodigious mass of masonry is composed of large cut stones, the smaller of which are from twelve to thirty feet in length, nine feet broad, and six feet thick; and three, on the west side, are the celebrated " Three Stones," which gave the temple the name rpi'\i6ov, trilithon. One of them is sixty-four feet long, another sixty- three feet eight inches, and the third sixty-three feet; in all one hundred and ninety feet eight inches, and they are thirteen feet in height, and not less than this in thickness. But the stone facile princeps among the colossal blocks is the great corner stone, in the course underlying the trilithon, which has hitherto been supposed to be composed of two stones, but which is evidently one stone, sixty-seven feet long by eighteen feet wide and thirteen feet high, being thus larger than either of the three lying above it. (Compare these dimensions with the great stone in the quarry on page 473.) These colossal substructions are of themselves one of the wonders of the world, and were there no splendid temples above them, would still fill us with astonishment and compel our admiration. Beneath this great platform are vast vaulted passages like railway tunnels, of massive architecture and beautifully constructed. The arches are evidently Roman, but the foundations are older, being of the same massive stones which appear outside on the north and