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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 450
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 450. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2660.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 450. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2660

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 450, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2660.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 450
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_471.jpg
Transcript 45° PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, .... Lysanias being the tetrarch of Abilene." The next morning after our arrival we had a fine view of the Abila cliffs in the light of a brilliant Syrian sunrise, and riding across the one-arched stone bridge we followed up the left bank of the river. The Barada has worn a deep channel through the rock, and on both sides of the road there is a grotesque geological formation of calcareous tufa. Reeds, branches of trees, leaves, and roots are encrusted with the soft spongy carbonate of lime, and the infiltration of centuries has fused them into a solid mass. About a half-hour's ride above the pass we come upon a fine cataract or cascade falling over a ledge of twenty feet high (see page 449), and above it are the ruins of two Roman bridges. We now emerge upon the verdant plain of Zebedany, through whose fresh green fields the river flows noiselessly and swiftly. During the summer season caravans of mules pour into this valley from all parts of Lebanon and Northern Syria, and return laden with its luscious apples, pears, quinces, apricots, and plums. On our right far up the mountain's side is the pleasant little village of Bludan, embowered in magnificent walnut and other fruit trees, and affording a safe and salubrious summer retreat for the European residents of Damascus. The plain of Zebedany is seven miles long, and varies from one to three miles wide, and is like an emerald carpet amid the barren desolated mountains which enclose it. The main fountain- head or source of the Barada is at the south-west end of this plain, in a small lake nine hundred feet long and three hundred feet wide. It is shallow and covered with reeds and water-lilies, and the stream flows north-east from it in a broad and deep current. After resting on a green bank beyond the village of Zebedany we rode on through 'Ain Hawar and Surghaya to the gorge of the river Yahfufeh, at the Jisr er Rummaneh, or " Pomegranate Bridge." Then turning to the left down the Wady Yahfufeh for one hour we crossed over a rocky and sterile ridge on a dangerous road, over slippery rocks and .broken stones, down the white hillside to the large Metawileh village of Neby Shit, the tomb of the prophet Seth, the son of Adam. On descending this rocky slope a magnificent landscape burst upon us. The green fertile plain of the Buka'a was at our feet, and on the west border rose the lofty range of Lebanon, its highest ridge covered with snow. I have seen this plain in February, when Hermon, Lebanon, and Anti-Lebanon were all sheeted with snow down to the very edge of the plain, which was green with the growing crops of wheat and barley, presenting a striking and beautiful contrast. The tomb of Seth is one hundred feet long and ten broad, built on a platform raised on two steps of masonry. The tomb, as usual with the Muslims, is covered with a green cloth—their sacred colour. Votive offerings hang on the tomb and on the walls around, as is the case at Neby Nuh, the tomb of Noah, on the opposite side of the Buka'a, near Zahleh (see page 451). The tomb of Ham, an hour north-east of Neby Shit, is only nine feet six inches long. The tomb of Noah, according to my measurement, is one hundred and five feet eight inches in length, within the walls ; and yet this only extends from his head to his knees, the feet are supposed to be in a deep pit beneath the tomb! The Muslims and other tribes in some parts of Syria lengthen their tombs according to