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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 446
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 446. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2656.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 446. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2656

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 446, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2656.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 446
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_467.jpg
Transcript 446 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. poplars, come suddenly upon the magnificent fountain 'Ain el Fijeh (see page 440), which is regarded by the people as the source of the Barada. The fountain bursts forth from a small cavern with two openings, over one of which is an arch. Above it is a large ancient platform of original rock and massive hewn stone. On this foundation are the ruins of a temple about thirty by thirty-three feet, built of large cut stones, but there is neither column, capital, nor pedestal. South of the opening of the fountain is another lower structure, built up from the bed of the stream itself, with two walls some two yards in thickness and nearly forty feet long, and twenty-seven feet apart, joined by a solid wall against the bank. This once formed a vaulted chamber of great solidity, twenty feet high, with a large portal in front, and in the rear a quadrangular opening or tunnel, from which a part of the fountain once issued, and low down in each of the side walls is also an opening for the discharge of the waters. Here was no doubt a small temple of great antiquity. South of the front lies the fragment of a column or pedestal of some simple order. Above the fountain, the platform, and the stream is a luxuriant growth of shade and fruit trees, shutting out the burning sun, and making this one of the most charming retreats of Syria. Yet this grand fountain with its crystal torrent is not the true source of the Barada. The true source is several hours further up the stream, near Bustan el 'Arab. Leaving 'Ain el Fijeh, we passed Deir Mukurrin and Kefr ez Zeit (" Village of Oil"), and thence to Kefr el Awamid (" Village of Columns "), five minutes above which, on a high spur of land, are the ruins of a Greek temple. There are numerous fallen columns, thirty-one inches in diameter, one being nearly twenty feet in length, and an immense Corinthian capital with parts of an ornamented pediment. Crossing the river on a stone bridge we came into the regular Damascus road, and in half an hour reached our tents, pitched below the road on a terrace overlooking the village of Suk Wady Barada, the ancient Abila. Just above the village the river makes a sharp turn. The lofty range, the backbone, as it were, of Anti- Lebanon, running north-east and south-west, is cut through by the river, which had been running parallel with the mnge on the west side and south of Zebedany, and here turns suddenly to the east and north-east, cutting a deep chasm through the range, forming a pass one hundred and fifty feet wide, with a northern wall some four hundred feet in height (see page 445). The village of Suk is embowered in gardens and orchards, and behind it on the north and west rises this stupendous mountain wall, like a vast amphitheatre. It seems to bar all progress westward. The scene is one of wild magnificence, and the remarkable remains of antiquity give it an additional charm. Leaving our camp we walked up the river some fifteen minutes to the stone bridge of a single arch, and crossed over to the north or left bank, in order to view this Petra of Northern Syria (see pages 447 and 448). Turning down the river below the bridge, we find the bank at first a slope of debris piled against the foot of the lofty cliffs. In this bank are hewn stones and broken columns of ancient temples, which have rolled down toward the river. Above it rises vertically the towering cliff, in the side of which are the famous