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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 444
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 444. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 444. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2654

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 444, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2654.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 444
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_465.jpg
Transcript 444 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. presented by grateful cities, long trains of captive Goths, Vandals, Sarmatians, Franks, Germans, Gauls, Syrians, Bedawin, and Egyptians. But the observed of all observers was Zenobia, Queen of Palmyra. " Her beauteous figure was confined by fetters of gold, a slave supported the gold chain which encircled her neck, and she almost fainted under the intolerable weight of jewels." She preceded on foot the magnificent chariot which she had built in Palmyra for her own triumphal entry into Rome. It was followed by two other gorgeous chariots, of Odenathus and the Persian king, after which came the triumphal car of Aurelian, drawn by four elephants. Aurelian bestowed fifteen thousand pounds of gold upon the Temple of the Sun in Rome, in which he placed the images of Belus and of the Sun, brought from Palmyra. His mother had been a priestess in a chapel of the Sun, and he was a devout worshipper of the God of Light. Should the new age of reform and material progress so ardently longed for by the oppressed races of Syria ever come, a railway from Tripoli, on the Mediterranean, via Hums, to the Euphrates would be indispensable. Palmyra would then be brought out of its desert isolation into the pathway of the nations. THE WADY BARADA. It was a fragrant spring morning when we set out from Damascus for Baalbek and Mount Lebanon via the Wady Barada. The perfume of fruit blossoms and spring wild flowers filled the air as we rode through the shady suburbs, amid murmuring waters, across the Taurah canal and then the Yezid, which irrigates Salihiyeh, the northern suburb of Damascus. We then turned our horses' heads up the steep barren ascent to the Kubbet Seiyar, commonly called " Kubbet en Nusr," or Dome of Victory. From this point, seven hundred feet above the level of the plain, we take a last look at Damascus. Our travelling party now turn northward, down the barren chalky rocks into the valley of the Barada. The scenery of this part of Anti-Lebanon is unique. ' Lebanon is one high range running from north to south, sending off lateral spurs or ranges westward down to the sea, wrhile on the east it stands like a colossal wall one hundred miles long, breaking down suddenly into the Buka'a. But Anti-Lebanon, known as Jebel esh Shurky, or the " East Mountain," is a series of parallel ranges, in general verdureless and barren, its loftier points glaring white in the summer's sun, giving the scene an air of painful desolation. What the Nile is to Egypt, the Barada is to Damascus. It seems a small stream as you ride along its banks, but the volume of water is great and unfailing. Along the river on both sides, in the deep narrow valley, every inch of land that can be reached by irrigation is cultivated, and the rows of tall poplars extend for miles, marking the course of the river as with a fringe of green, running zigzag among the chalky hills. Following the left bank of the river, high up on the rocky slope, then descending along the base of a high ridge and passing through vineyards and orchards of fig-trees, we reached the river Barada at Bessima (see