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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 442
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 442. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2652.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 442. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2652

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 442, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2652.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 442
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_463.jpg
Transcript 442 PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. ruins of the city there is not a wall or stone which can be identified as belonging to the era of the Hebrew monarch, the only approximation being the hill of Balkis, Queen of Sheba, south of the sulphur fountain. Palmyra is not alluded to in the history of the younger Cyrus or the campaigns of Alexander the Great. The decline of Tyre and Jerusalem, however, opened the way for the revival of the ancient city. Pliny says it was the first care of Parthia and Rome, when at war, to engage Palmyra in their interest. Mark Antony, during the triumvirate in 38 b.c, attempted to plunder Palmyra, on the ground of its having violated the neutrality between the Romans and Parthians. During the successive wars between these two great empires it increased rapidly in commercial and military importance, and became a wealthy and magnificent city. In 130 a.d. it submitted to Adrian, and, though nominally subject to Rome, had a senate and popular assembly of its own, as is seen from the inscriptions found among its ruins. Adrian adorned the city with many of its grandest temples and colonnades, gave it his own name, Adrianopolis, and conferred upon it the dignity and rank of a Roman colony. More than a century later, a.d. 260, when Odenathus, a noble of Palmyra, by his valour and military prowess had avenged the ignoble captivity of the Roman emperor Valerian, by expelling Sapor, the Persian monarch, from Syria and.Mesopotamia, he was rewarded by being associated with Gallienus in the imperial rule, 264 a.d. After a brief reign of three years Odenathus was assassinated in Hums, and his brilliant and heroic widow Zenobia assumed the reins of government in 267 a.d. By her heroism, self-denial, and wisdom, this remarkable and gifted woman ruled the East for five years with justice and clemency. She mastered not only the Arabic and Syriac, but the Greek and Latin languages, and called to her counsels the philosopher Longinus, who was not only her counsellor in matters of state, but her teacher in the poetry of Homer and the wisdom of Plato. Zenobia appointed him one of her counsellors, and in this capacity, and cherishing doubtless the traditional antipathies of the Greek toward the Roman, he persuaded her to shake off the Roman yoke, and dictated, it is said, a defiant letter to the Emperor Aurelian. The letter of Zenobia to Aurelian, who had assumed the purple in 270 a.d., declaring her independence, provoked his hostility, and in 271 he marched through Asia Minor into Syria, defeated the army of Zenobia under her general, Zabdas, the conqueror of Egypt, in two great battles near Antioch and Hums. The Queen was present in both engagements, but after the . Hums defeat could no longer rally her army, and retreated within the walls of her capital, Palmyra. The Emperor followed through the sandy desert, perpetually harassed by the Bedawin Arabs, and began the siege of Palmyra. Still he offered her favourable terms of capitulation—for herself a splendid retreat, for the citizens their ancient privileges. The offer was indignantly rejected ; but on the arrival of Probus from Egypt with heavy reinforcements, Zenobia resolved to fly. She mounted the fleetest of her dromedaries, and had already reached the Euphrates, sixty miles from Palmyra, when Aurelian's light horse seized her, and brought her a captive to the feet of the