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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 439
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 439. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2649.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 439. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2649

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 439, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2649.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 439
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_460.jpg
Transcript PALMYRA. 439 h'ect of the deepest interest. The attention of archaeologists is just beginning to be turned this interesting part of Syria. The newly discovered site of Carchemish, the old Hittite i-# adorn the Hamath inscriptions, the Palmyrene tower sepulchres, and this great tribe of R 1 worshipping Nusairiyeh, all point to new revelations in the near future with regard to th t old Hittite people who acted so prominent a part in the external history of Israel. Near the north-western end of the colonnade are two mausoleums of great beauty in a commanding site (see pages 431 and 435), and farther to the west a group of small temples, in which the sculpture is of the most exquisite finish. In one of them was a portico of four columns, and at each side were porches supported on five rows of columns, four in each row. The cella is about one hundred feet long, with a semicircular recess at the far end. It is nearly all razed to the ground, but the foundations can be traced. On a broken architrave is a fragment of a Latin inscription, containing the names of Diocletian and the Caesars Constantius and Maximinianus, proving that the building was erected between a.d. 292 and a.d. 305. The ruins in this vicinity are in a remarkable state of preservation, the carvings and corners beino- as sharply defined as when fresh from the sculptor's hand. The west side of many of the columns, however, is corroded by the winds and storms. At Ba'albek the north side of the capitals and entablature of the six columns are similarly worn away. To the north of the colonnade are three temples and a church. One of these temples is beautifully preserved, with a porch of six columns, all standing, of which four are in front. This building illustrates the extent to which the debris of former buildings has accumulated in Palmyra. The pedestals or brackets projecting from the columns of this porch are only twenty inches above the ground, indicating that the bases of the columns are considerably below the surface. The columns now look short and awkward, and the portal is too wide for its height. The entablature above the porch and walls still remains, but the roof has fallen in. If the masses of rubbish could be excavated, the old city level would no doubt be found far below the present surface of the ground. HISTORICAL SKETCH OF PALMYRA. " And Solomon built Baalath, and Tadmor in the wilderness, in the land."—i Kings ix. 18. "And Solomon went to Hamath-zobah, and prevailed against it. And he built Tadmor in the wilderness, and all the store cities, which he built in Hamath."—2 Chron. viii. 3, 4. In the former of these passages this city is called Tamar, ">EJn, and in the latter "WJEI, ladmor. The word Tamar in both Hebrew and Arabic means palm, or fruit, and Tadmor means probably " City of Palms." The word Palmyra is simply the Latin translation of the c • • . . Semitic original. The present name, and the only one by which it is known to the Arabic- speaking races, is Tudmur. Palmyra is an example of both the changing and the changeless in the East. Its name a mor remains. Its commercial importance is gone. The lines of national traffic have shifted from the Euphrates Valley to the Suez Canal and the Straits of Gibraltar. This once- ious city, the seat of ancient commerce, the highway of the nations, the outpost of King