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Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Page 438
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Wilson, Charles William, Sir. Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 438. 1881. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2648.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir. (1881). Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 438. Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands. Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2648

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Wilson, Charles William, Sir, Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1 - Page 438, 1881, Exotic Impressions, Views of Foreign Lands, Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic/item/2694/show/2648.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Picturesque Palestine, Sinai, and Egypt, Vol. 1
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Wilson, Charles William, Sir
Publisher D. Appleton and Company
Date 1881
Description Index: Introduction / by the Very Rev. Dean Stanley -- Jerusalem / by Col. Wilson -- Bethlehem and the north of Judaea / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- The mountains of Judah and Ephraim / by Lieut. Conder -- Samaria and the Plain of Esdraelon / by Miss E. Rogers -- Esdraelon and Nazareth / by the Rev. Canon Tristram -- Galilee, Northern Galilee, Caesarea Philippi and the highlands of Galilee, Mount Hermon and its temples / by the Rev. Dr. S. Merrill -- Damascus / by the Rev. Dr. P. Schaff -- Palmyra, The Wady Barada, Ba'albek / by the Rev. S. Jessup.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Egypt
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
Genre (AAT)
  • books
  • illustrations (layout features)
  • plates (illustrations)
  • maps (documents)
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location DS107 .W73 v. 1
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1703789~S11
Digital Collection Exotic Impressions: Views of Foreign Lands
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/exotic
Repository Kenneth Franzheim II Rare Books Room, William R. Jenkins Architecture and Art Library, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/william-r-jenkins-architecture-art-library
Use and Reproduction No Copyright - United States
Identifier exotic_201304_014
Item Description
Title Page 438
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name exotic_201304_014_459.jpg
Transcript 43$ PICTURESQUE PALESTINE. Balkis, a descendant of Yarab Ibn Kahtan of Yamen, and that Solomon married her. This would account for their naming a hill in Palmyra " Tell Balkis," had Solomon actually built or reconstructed Palmyra; but if Solomon had nothing to do with Palmyra, it would be difficult to explain the association of the Queen of Sheba's name with a spot so remote from Jerusalem. One cannot cease to wonder how Palmyra could have sustained so great a population with so meagre a water supply. The fountain on the south-west of the city furnishes a copious stream, but the water is warm, and so impregnated with sulphur as to be extremely offensive. After flowing eastward, however, nearly two hundred rods, it becomes cooler, and the sulphurous taste partly disappears; but it could hardly have served the great city for other than medicinal, bathing, and agricultural purposes. For drinking water the ancient city must have had recourse to wells and rain-water cisterns. This fountain, however, must have determined the importance of the site and made it the key of the East. It is now resorted to in the summer by the Bedawin Arabs, of whom no less than twenty thousand are often encamped here at once. It is so necessary to the 'Anazeh, that the rulers of Syria in different ages have found its possession to be a guarantee of subjection on the part of these lords of the desert. South of the fountain is a large cemetery with about twenty tower sepulchres of great antiquity. In one of them are two life-sized statues, sadly mutilated, " with flowing robes and close jackets curiously and elaborately laced over the chest." Near by are numerous subterranean tombs, whose arched roofs rise just enough above the surface of the ground to reveal their existence. A few are open, but the majority are buried beneath the debris of ages, and in all probability still undisturbed, with all their treasures of statuary and memorial tablets. One which was broken through a few years since is cruciform, with three tiers of loculi in each compartment. Several statuettes and other ornaments were discovered in it. The Count de Vogue, French Ambassador at Vienna, has published an extended account of the Palmyrene inscriptions. His translations and comments are invaluable. In his view the inscriptions are of four kinds : the monumental, chiefly attached to the pedestals and brackets of statues ; those on tombs ; the religious, on votive altars ; and those on articles of terra-cotta. The oldest (on a tomb) bears date of b.c. 9. On one of the columns of the Grand Colonnade is an inscription once attached to a statue of Odenathus, who is called " King of Kings," and on an adjoining column is the name of his wife, the world-renowned Zenobia, the date on both being a.d. 271. According to this same author the Palmyrenes worshipped three gods, or a threefold god, the first person being " Baal Samim," the god of the heavens ; the second, " Malek Baal," answering to the sun, and the third, " Agli Baal," to the moon. There are traces of this same worship in our own day in that strange people, the Nusairiyeh, supposed to be the descendants of the ancient Hittites, whose kingdom extended in ancient days from Antioch to Damascus, and from the sea to or even beyond the Euphrates. The Nusairiyeh, who now number a quarter of a million people, chiefly between Antioch and Tripoli, observe so many of the old rites of the Baal-worshippers, with adoration of the sun, moon, and stars, that their religion is